How to Successfully Stream on Twitch as a Producer

The one thing that I’m asked by so many producers every day is, what kind of content should I create for my fans?

In this episode we’re going to go down one of the many avenues of content you can create for your fans.

Join my guest, Richie Wang a.k.a. 6th Street, and me as we discuss how to successfully stream on Twitch as a producer.

Richie runs a very successful Twitch stream where he gives feedback to any and all producer’s who submit their track for feedback. He’s perfected his brand and how to be “likeable” on Twtich! Learn how to do what he does and start monetizing your stream immediately!

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • How to set up a Twitch stream
  • How to brand yourself on Twitch
  • How to monetize your stream
  • Why Twitch is an important medium
  • The importance of building a community for your fanbase

and so much more!

Episode Links

 

6th Street Music –  https://open.spotify.com/artist/2sHAbRGQCgU6sqaMJ1FoPd

6th Street Twitch Stream – https://www.twitch.tv/6thstreetmusic

6th Street Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/6thstreetmusic/

Twitch – https://www.twitch.com

OBS Studio – https://obsproject.com/

Stream Elements – https://streamelements.com/

Electronic Dance Money Episode 003 – How to Brand Yourself as a Producer – https://www.enviousaudio.com/podcast-episode-003-how-to-brand-yourself-as-a-producer/

Automatic Episode Transcript — Please excuse any errors, not reviewed for accuracy

 
Hey, guys. Welcome to electronic dance money. You’re number one business resource for making money as electronic musicians and producers. All right, welcome, everyone to the fourth episode of electronic dance money. And today is going to be a great episode. I’m so excited for this. I’ve been working on getting this episode prepared for the past few weeks, talking to my guest, Um, which is Richard Wang of Sixth Street Music. And he is someone who I met. Oh, probably a few months ago. I remember I posted in the Producer Dojo Group looking for hip hop producers because I had a client who was a rapper and someone had posted your name and I for some, because I’ve been part of the community for a while now, like over a year now. And for some reason, I still hadn’t heard your music, and I checked you out and your shit was unbelievable. Sent your friend request, and then oh, man, it was probably I think I just started seeing you posting about your twitch stream, which I was like, Oh, that seems cool. And then I remember I saw video from your twitch stream of deejaying with someone Yes, I remember that. Who was that
spk_1                 
was That was my friend. He goes by deejay dumpling as the first and only guest deejay stream that we’ve had But you tune in for that one.
spk_0                 
I didn’t eso I didn’t tune in. I just saw a clip from it And I remember watching it And you’re just like, oh, like, do this is sick And then I saw you post about your stream. I think on Facebook when you’re going live and I decided to check it out and I was just blown away with what you’re doing. Or maybe you even actually, Actually, no. I think we were talking and you message me and you’re telling me about your stream and I tuned in and I was just blown away with what you’re doing because it’s it’s just great.
spk_1                 
Thanks. I appreciate that.
spk_0                 
I mean, the the community that you’re building within your twitch, your very humble with everything you’re doing, you bring all these producers in, and it’s just straight feedback. You’re helping these young producers out, and what’s even better is a lot of the frequent producers that come in every every stream. They have a new track, you can progressively hear them get better and better. They’re taking the feedback that everyone is giving them within the stream there growing. And it’s just phenomenal. I’m having you on today so that we can talk about how producers can utilize twitch, because I think that’s, you know, twitches designed. I mean, originally it was designed just for gamers to stream, but now it’s become such a bigger thing. There’s so many different sub topics within that, and I think twitches such a extremely useful resource for producers to use to not only create content but keep their bans engaged with them. Yeah, they feel e. I mean, your fans can get to know you so much more, especially when they see you. They see reacting to music. Yeah, they can just see the passion that you have for it, which is just so important. So that’s why I want to have you on today, because I think a lot of producers can learn from what you’re doing and figure out how they can start to monetize things on twitch and get a step closer to becoming a full time producer. And I mean what you’ve been doing the stream since January. Right. You
spk_1                 
have early February. So the end of January ish around that time.
spk_0                 
Okay, so I mean, but six months. Not even maybe 56 months crazy. Yeah. And how many subscribers are you at now?
spk_1                 
Uh, subscribers is usually city between 30 or 40. And then I hit, like, 650 followers, I think just recently. So she’s which I’m very, very happy about. And it’s been a crazy journey, just like jumping onto twitch and the whole community and the environment. Such a different world. And there’s a whole culture they didn’t really understand about twitch until I just kind of hopped in. But yeah, man, I’m stoked where it’s going. Them kind of excited where it’s gonna go down the line to
spk_0                 
every time that I’m in the stream, you at least get like two or three new followers and your streaming three times week, Chris.
spk_1                 
Three times a week, Two hours each time. So six hours a week.
spk_0                 
Yeah. So six hours and you get a few new followers each time, and then every once in a while, see someone subscribe. So I mean that that traction builds and as you get that families, especially with producers who are constantly in there. I mean, they become dedicated followers for what you’re doing. You become their favorite producer. They’re sharing that stream with their friends who are producers. And you just gain those followers and those subscribers that that’s over, ah, 100 followers a month that you’re getting And that’s just that’s crazy.
spk_1                 
Appreciate that. Yeah, you’ve seen it. You’ve seen from the very beginning to like you popped in a couple months ago, I think, And then you’ve kind of seen as it’s grown from like, very new to know I’m, like, not as new. I still feel pretty nuance, which, to be honest. But, um, I think that it’s been cool to see how the channel has matured. You know, I don’t feel like a new penny more. I still feel newish, but I’m not a new of anymore.
spk_0                 
Well, you can tell how comfortable you are on camera. You’re very personal. You’re very likeable. Your yourself, which is very important when you’re doing this kind of thing, cause you need to be genuine and authentic to who you are. Otherwise, people can see through the bullshit and fakeness of someone who’s just, you know, on their trying to make money. And I mean, there is no sense of it is you want to be on there and you want to monetize because you have goals of becoming full time so that you can provide more music and art to people. But within that comes authenticity, like authenticity has to follow. If you do want to monetize this kind of thing,
spk_1                 
yeah, I think something like Twitch, where it’s a live stream where there are no edits, right? You can’t add anything you say you can’t edit the arms and eyes and like if you if you fall out of your chair, everyone’s going to see it like that’s what is really special about twitch. But that’s also the challenge about Twitter’s well, because, like you said, you need to be really authentic because, like a face to face conversation, you can’t really bullshit your way through that just down the street on the oh, yeah, yeah, sure. If this is ah, PG Stream or not are Oh no, it’s
spk_0                 
explicit. It’s got marked explicit on all
spk_1                 
those all the podcasts I cut so much on my stream it’s a cleaner stream. I try to keep it clear just cause I know how the Internet can get. But yeah, in a face to face conversation, it’s easy to read if someone’s not into it or some of energy is low. Um, and that’s a special thing about live streaming. People gets a really understand your personality and the way that you are without edits, you know, which is really cool. It’s very personal, but it’s also the challenge. It’s a huge challenge to because if you’re not feeling too that day, like man, you just gotta do it is to some degree you have to turn it on when the camera turns on because it’s two hours of the camera on you. Everything’s recorded. If you say something horrible, like someone clipped that and that could destroy your career. And that’s the really Ah, that’s a double edge sort of live streaming, you know,
spk_0                 
it could be risky. You can definitely be risk.
spk_1                 
Yeah, what Recently there was a live streamer and she was just walking around in L. A. And she made like this joke that was kind of racially charged, and she’s also a deejay producer as well. And that blew up. Someone clipped. It was like viral on Reddit and, like Loki, sank her career for a little bit. I think she’s fine, but like her public image was just destroyed from like a slip up. Sometimes we say in the in context you like joking with friends. You say something that’s like, sort of like maybe a little bit. Not so pc Um, or maybe a little bit racially charged. But you don’t mean to be racist. But then someone clips out of context in a stream, and all of a sudden people can kind of put their own assumptions to that context, and then it could really be dangerous. So that’s of the I had to learn, even for myself. The hard way on twitch is that everything you do and say is recorded, and you do have to be aware you can’t just be relaxed on stream and just say whatever that you want to say, Um, you got it. You have to be really aware,
spk_0                 
right? Definitely, I 100% agree with that. I think I think, more importantly, you just don’t know who’s watching or listening, because you know you could have all these fans that love you and care so deeply about you, and their full support is with you. But if there’s one person who is jealous of you and doesn’t like what you’re doing, and they see that kind of slip up because they’re waiting for it to take it and use it against you, Yeah, as fucked up as is, there are people out there, they’re doing that and it just really sucks. Because people are just their motivations are very weird. Sometimes you can you can see it a lot with younger, younger producers who are really knew or maybe their year in. They haven’t kind of gotten over that hump of It’s a community, you know, as musicians were all here for each other. But there are. A lot of musicians were younger who are just They don’t understand the hard work that goes into being a producer, especially when you’re trying to go full time, and that’s it’s unfortunate, but it happens. It’s not all of the young producers. The majority are there to help everyone, Yes, but you just have You’re
spk_1                 
gonna have bad eggs everywhere, so you just gotta especially if you’re doing anything in entertainment, Um,
spk_0                 
they did successful. Anything remotely success? Yes.
spk_1                 
There’s gonna be people who are going to try to take you down in shady ways. But, um, I think at the end of the day, your work ethic and your daily grind is going to overcome that. You know?
spk_0                 
Well, in your authenticity to yeah, with, you know, with authenticity. You just you can’t beat that. If you people want to see you, they want to hear you. And what makes six street music They want to know more about you. And, um, you know, with that off authenticity, it beats out all that bullshit.
spk_1                 
Yeah, Authenticity is the only way, in my opinion, t to be sustainable in this industry because if you’re trying toe, hold open image of yourself the whole time, that gets really heavy over the course of years. So the only way when you’re an artist putting yourself out there and your own personality and your own product out there, I think the only way to be sustainable for the long game is to be as authentic and is true to yourself as possible. So let’s get a
spk_0                 
little bit Mawr into your background, cause I’m sure there’s some people who are listening who are like, Oh, I really like this guy. Where’s he come, bro? What’s what’s his story? So what is your story? How did you get into producing what made you want to go into this world of twitch streaming? I mean, what made you want to get into the world of bass music?
spk_1                 
Yeah, I love based music. That’s something I really enjoyed making. But I would say that my passion, the stuff that I love making, is I would call it more like future Basie melodic, dub step sort of stuff. But yeah, like that’s that stuff that lovemaking. And I love making that music because I was inspired by other artists. I think every single producer has a story where they heard another artist, and then the world froze for them. And they’re like, How in the world did you make that like crazy experience? You know, and everything stops and you ask yourself this song or something like I’ve never heard and I’m really emotionally attached to it. But for me that that happened a couple years ago, so I’ll back out. Backtrack a little bit. I originally went to school as a pre med student, so I went to I went to college studying human biology, and the idea was that I wanted to be a doctor. After I graduated from college, I went to USC for school here in L. A. That’s why I actually moved from Minnesota, where I’m from to L. A. And now I’m still here now. Halfway through college, I had joined a hip hop dance crew on campus, and I fell in love with dancing, and I don’t know if you knew this, but I’ve been a full time dancer for much longer than I’ve been a producer. So my full time gig in L. A. Has been since 2013. Special dancer, professional choreographer shows Vegas, India like that’s That’s been that’s been my thing for a long time. So entertainment is not necessarily a foreign place to me. So I think being a dancer and being choreographer, what’s that graduate from college? I decided I wasn’t gonna go to med school anymore. I decided I wanted to pursue dance professionally. That’s aren’t just 13. I think being a dancer to that was already the beginnings of my life as a producer. The ability toe like, really experience music in that way and portrayed music through your body is kind of the beginnings of, like, my passion for music. I’ve always loved music, and that’s part of the reason why I fell in love with dance in the first place to maybe two or three years ago. I remember some of my friends were just making so my dance friends they were just making beats unable to. And then I was like, Holy crap! I didn’t realize that you could just dial it able to make be It’s like That’s It’s like photo Shop. But for music, I’m like I didn’t do that, So that happened. I didn’t realize that a Bolton was so accessible. And second, I remember hearing Porter Robinson’s World Album Way Back in the Day World’s Album and it blew my mind. And I remember when I first heard CIA voices, I was working on some chemistry project, and then my whole world froze when it came up on YouTube, and then nothing else mattered. But me Importers music is cheesy as oh yeah, um, or over in a separate occasion, I heard language by Porter in some documents as class. Yeah, and everything froze for me. And I was like, What is this music? I’ve never heard of e t m before, right? So that’s where my love for electronic music happened. And then I discovered that Mableton was accessible. I’m like, what? I just Dalit able to just like Dink around with it. So I got a new Mac book pro and then I got a built in on it and I just aren’t messing around And I’ll never get the feeling of When I first made this little cute Sea beach summertime by beat and I was sat there I was like, Wait, this actually sounds OK, it’s garbage. It just like the feeling of creating your first song got me hooked. And I was like, I just spent days in the Dodgers trying to figure out what these tools did, trying to create this sound in my head, and that was two years ago. So two years ago was the first time I opened up Mableton and downloaded it, and two years later I’m still hooked on that feeling.
spk_0                 
What I’m even more blown away and how I can tell you’re going to be such a bigger producer than you are now is that you just started two years ago. When use when you hear the kind of music that producers like you who have only been in the game for a couple of years or making and they’re releasing I mean you can you can just hear the natural talent and it’s your music is unbelievable.
spk_1                 
Thank you. I appreciate that.
spk_0                 
I can hear the inspiration that you get from Porter in your tracks, and it’s just it’s fucking incredible. It’s such great work. I can see exactly why Bill Gates is starting to kind of take you under his wing and guide you, and it’s just it’s incredible work that you’re doing with the dancing to. I can totally see how when you get started. If you’re getting started as a dancer and hip hop, of course you’re gonna You’re going to slowly develop some sense of liking dance music just cause they, you know, with all the remixes of hip hop tracks trying to make things different and interesting. Obviously they go together, but when you’re in the professional dance world, even more So do you get a lot of your influences from dancing as well? Like, do you kind of look at some of the tracks you’re working on and say, Well, what would I want to dance to in addition to wanna listen, Teoh or choreograph a dance to?
spk_1                 
I think it depends on the track that I’m making so a lot of the more like trying to focus stuff that I make. It’s It’s I can tell what feels good in the body. But it’s not necessarily music I make to Cora graphed to, whereas if I’m creating like a hip hop Bangor or like, just like some sort of stripped down hip hop beat for a rapper, I know that that beat has to make you want to, like, really, really dance. So it’s, I think they’re two different goals there, you know. But I think that being a dancer has given me a overall a deeper impression of just feeling music. And that translates in direct ways or indirect ways in my production, you know, and I’ve been like dancing my whole life and growing up as well. I, like was playing piano and took like drum classes and I played the trombone and band. So, like all of this stuff that like soft skills when I was growing up, they directly translated into my production. So the past two years, I think what has helped me a lot is all those soft skills. Um, and too, it’s been two years of learning the dog versus learning music theory and learning how to play keys and all that stuff playing keys and stuff. I brought into my a Bolton experience, you know?
spk_0                 
Yeah, I think that’s super important to I. You know, when I started producing back in 2013 I remember I I went out. I saved my own money and I got a piano teacher because I realized how important that was to have that music theory background, knowing my keys, knowing how to improvise on the piano so I can sit there and just play whatever. Knowing what I know now, I just wish I would have been put into piano lessons at a young age, and it’s not at fault by my parents whatsoever. When I was young, I I was in every single sport, and I quit every single one of them within the first week. I was very stubborn, so I don’t blame my parents for not putting me in piano. I guarantee I would have just wanted to quit. But you know, now that I’m in music, I’d wish I would have had that and definitely, like if and when that whenever I have kids, I’m definitely putting them in some sort of music theory piano. Just because I think that’s very important to get that sort of musical impression at a young age and understand how music works because you music fuels life. I think of a world without music, and it’s a boring, colorless world. It sucks.
spk_1                 
Yeah, Now I feel you. If I don’t put my kids through anything or tell any newer producers like to interest to pick up, it would be the piano and percussion any sort of my drum kit, any sort of if you just play like snare drum on the drum blind but understanding rhythm and the understanding a piano roll, like just how to read the keys that’s like directly translatable into any dog,
spk_0                 
right? It’s extreme, it’s extremely important, and, you know, I never learned. I mean, when I was really really young. I was in band. I played trumpet when I was in banded like fifth to seventh grade or something, and that’s when I knew how to read music. I don’t know, really know how to read sheet music anymore, but, you know, nowadays, I don’t think that’s as important. I think if you’re a producer, if you could just really learn your keys and how your keys air structured, you’re not going to be. I mean, unless you’re getting into, like, you want to eventually write an album that you compose into an orchestra. But I mean, even then you could hire someone to right into an orchestral piece. You don’t learn your keys if you’re younger producer and you’re trying to get in the game. If you just learn your piano keys, understand how your hand should be placed on the piano. Like you said, understand the piano roll. I mean, you’ll be solid. You’ll pick it up fairly quickly.
spk_1                 
Yeah, just give years of production if you understand the musical aspects because there’s understanding how toe big music and in this understanding how to work the dog. Technically there’s two different skills there, right? So if you’re able to develop any sort of skill with understanding music, whether it’s vocals, percussion or melodies or harmonies like that is all soft skills that translate into the dog.
spk_0                 
Let’s get into the topic for today, which is about Twitter. How you got involved with Twitch. How did that come up? How did you sit down? Go. You know what? I’m gonna start streaming on twitch and giving people feedback because I think that’s like I mean, I wouldn’t have I never would have thought to do that at all. I’m starting to stream some of the lessons I do for some of my clients. But I never would have thought Teoh let me just give producers feedback because I think it’s a really good idea.
spk_1                 
Yeah, yeah, that. Okay, so it started as something very different. Um, so there is a streamer that I used to follow? No, I still follow. Her name is Jenna. And she is, um, like, probably one of the top music streamers on twitch. Right now. She’s been the front page a couple times, but she is this, like, young girl, like maybe 20 something and pretty new produce certain up. New producer she just graduate from music school and she’s been producing for a while. But she streams Music discovery, where she looks up like people submit like Don’t music online. And she like, finds music for her, D J. Says. And she streams or D J sets. Yeah, and her D J sets are like popping off and people love like hanging out on Friday nights with her and like she plays, it’s really cool sets and records them and put them on YouTube. And I was like, Whoa, that’s like really working for her. And in my mind, when I saw Jana’s Channel, it was almost like it was like the backbone of her music career, because these are a lot of people that are crazy about her, you know? And she’s talking with them and like you could tell, she really connection with a lot of her fans that way. So for me, I was like, You know what? I’m coming back from ah choreography job in India and in January this past January, and I was like, you know, I’m gonna try that when you get back, so once you get back, I have a long time back at home. Let’s figure out how to stream it Sounds like a fun thing. I didn’t realize how challenging it was, though, so even just figuring out O. B s and even figuring out how to do your overlays and setting up for tips stuff and like setting up your identifications and is your laptop strong enough for streaming? There’s so much stuff that I didn’t realize that what into streaming, um, that I spent a whole month all of January. Just doing a research is setting up the channel. But the idea was to create a platform that I could interact with people and they could see me and understand my personality and, like we could build a relationship. That’s kind of the main reason why I want to start twitch in the first place. So when I first started streaming, I’d say February early February’s when I, like first turned on streaming. I was using re stream to stream to both Facebook and to twitch at the same time, because on twitch I had, like zero followers. There was nobody very, you know. And for me, I remember the first time I turn on the camera like how scared I was. And men like this is really everything I say is gonna be on the Internet now. And it’s not like I’m scared of performance, but it’s just that streaming is a new thing. You know, I’m sitting on my computer and everyone can hear what I say. I respond to people real time. But I started basically the whole idea. The chain on the first place was to create a platform, kind of like what I was seeing with other producers, where people can connect with me personally because I think it’s really important for a producer to put out their personality these days because it colors their branding, it adds. It adds another dimension to a brand or your artist’s name beyond just music. And there’s so much music out these days. For me, it was finding a way differentiate six street music from another future based producer. That’s how it all started and after the first time I streamed. It is kind of production, like that feeling of Holy crap. I just was live for two hours, you know, and you kind of feel this like sense of accomplishment in this high from it. I kept wind upgrade my stream, you know, And I like find ways, toe, make it sexier, make it look nicer. You know, I got these lights behind me because of it. Try to find ways to upgrade The look of the stream became just a natural thing because I wanted to just keep getting better at it. You know, it has really grown a lot over the past six months, but the original goal was just to make a platform where I connect with other people.
spk_0                 
It’s a genius way to connect with your fans in. It’s because, you know, if you’re a relatively small producer, you’re more than likely not getting all these big gigs where people can hear you live and they can meet you after the show and talk to you and meet you face to face. So this is a way for you to break that barrier with people all around the world. Not just if you’re playing in one city or in your local area, you can connect with someone who’s 3000 miles away and connect with them on real personal level, where you actually talk to them. You can say their name. They can hear you. You are giving them feedback and helping them that’s so important to build that community. And it helps build trust, too. So people trust you in what you’re doing as a producer, and they’re more willing to support you and go head over heels to help you out in your career, which is very important.
spk_1                 
Yeah, I feel like I feel like there’s something about creating. If you are somebody, that they like you as a person, they’re much more likely to support your product or your music. Oh, yeah, you know,
spk_0                 
it’s brand trust, its grisly. It’s all about brand trust. And in order to do that, I mean, this goes into what we were just talking about before authenticity. If you have that authentic viewpoint and you share that with the world and you’re open to people, they crave that. It’s just like with podcast man podcaster. Another medium of people can hear you. They learn from you and they understand you in your personality. So much mawr rather than if you read an article, you know, if you if you hear someone talk and have a conversation with someone else for an hour, whether It’s a stream, whether it’s a YouTube video or podcast. When they hear that and they get that connection, it’s It’s so much stronger than just reading something that they posted online. It’s not as foreign because, you know, with social media, it’s still a new thing. It’s still fairly foreign, But having that medium of seeing someone hearing them, I mean, you think of an actor. When you see an actor and so many movies, you feel like you know them You really ask. You don’t necessarily know because they’re playing something else but you still you have this connection of like I’ve seen this person. I’ve heard them talk. I feel like I could get along with them.
spk_1                 
Yeah, I think it’s a I think it’s really about that facial recognition. I think podcast is great because it’s ah, it’s a it’s informational. It’s the person’s voice. But like you said with movies and with streaming and YouTube videos, even on like Instagram, the content that people connect with the most our faces people are looking for, I think this day and age not only products that make them happy, but also connection with people over the Internet So I think that’s why streaming so powerful is that you see their face and their reaction as well. And that says, Ah, lot, even without saying any words as well as their words at the same time. So I think that the medium of video or just live streaming is such a powerful online content tool. You know,
spk_0                 
branding yourself is such an important thing because you don’t want to be like every other twitch streamer. You want something that differentiates yourself and you’ve done such a good job at this and
spk_1                 
so funny, because I don’t even I in my mind, I’m like, man, I could be doing a better job. I would love to get your son. Yes, it
spk_0                 
is so interactive. So much fun. Everything you do in it. I mean, let’s just get into a little bit of it. You have the dope sauce. Can you tell people about what? You because, you know, I still see ever since day? Yeah. Ever since the first time in the stream, you’re showing this dope saw. So So I was like, what is I don’t know what it is, but I fucking love it. And then you tell people that throw dope, sausage and people are thrown emotes of a fucking picture does that. I just It’s hilarious. It’s fun. It’s interactive. Everyone can be involved with it. He’s fucking perfect. It is so good. It’s even better for your brand. I mean, it’s It’s you like I’m starting to associate dope sauce with the Sixth Street brands, which is perfect. I mean, that’s what you want. You
spk_1                 
so. But if you hear someone say,
spk_0                 
hope sauce, you want them to now associate with your brain. And I have a feeling that’s definitely going to be a part of your brand at your live shows? No, real, which is going to be extremely exciting. However, you orient that if you come up Oh, my God. OK, here we go. Sixth Street Hot sauce. Now that
spk_1                 
I thought I thought about that, too, making that a company. But that’s gonna wait on
spk_0                 
the way down the road. I mean, please let you know if you ever make some fucking sixth Street dope sauce.
spk_1                 
Hot sauce. I love hot sauce. Oh, don’t get me wrong. It’s gonna be awesome.
spk_0                 
But anyways, what is the dope sauce? How did you come up with that because it’s just It’s so it felt It feels natural the way you came.
spk_1                 
Appreciate that. Yeah. So dope sauce is That’s my McGovern’s laughing I That’s what they say. Normally I say stupid stuff. And sometimes when things were really cool, I say dope sauce when things are lame, I actually lame sauce. I used to do that mawr But that was just something that I said on stream. And I think my girlfriend lives pointed it out and she was like, Oh, that’s a your thing that you say but it’s totally you, you know, um and I think I said onstream randomly one time. All like, this song is like super dope sauce. And then I saw I was eating dinner upstairs and I had this little bottle of hot sauce and next to me, and I just reached over and my Okay, this is gonna be the dope sauce. I didn’t know how big of a deal was gonna be at the time, but I was like, Oh, like yo, that was dope sauna. So check this out. I got some hostels right here. This is the dope sauce. You everyone give him some props, you know? But it was just something that I said, and I just realized that that just clicked and it wasn’t something. I plan to click it all but things up. People liked it, and people were enjoying the fact that I was like saying this super dump thing dope sauce. So it clicked. And then this is the same sauce I’m showing on camera right now that I’ve had for six months. It is a change color, and
spk_0                 
you are listening. I remember what it was. It was red, right? It was rather remember, was red. And
spk_1                 
it’s like dissolved into or fermented into, like some yellow is now
spk_0                 
it is gnarly looking, but
spk_1                 
I get a better dope sauce or switch it out. But that branding idea basically just came as an accident. Um, it was something that just clicked. It was something I said normally, and it just kind of became part of the Six Street brand. And it’s just fun for somebody to come into the stream who’s been there before to connect to something that they already know. Like it’s kind of an inside joke. Um and ah, lot of the things within the community is kind of creating inside jokes with the community so that they feel like they’re they’re, you
spk_0                 
know, they’re understating else. Yeah, right. Other which people like that people like to be the other if there are part of a group.
spk_1                 
Yeah, but honestly, like that’s almost thinking about for, um, my 63 brands like what differentiates me and what can I add to the Stream or my music project to make it more unique? And dope sauce was just a random thing that just happened. You know, I also added the whole dabbing thing and just, like, just dance stuff, cause I’m like, Oh, it’s something that is dance related. It’s fun. Like people. It gives people an incentive to follow. I have. You know what it is? They connect. Yeah, that’s right. That’s right. And people on my title says, I will dab for follow that there’s some guy on twitch that drinks mustard for follow. So that’s a great idea, but not mustard. But what could I do? Is that a mustard? Let’s dab instead, which is totally not the same. But why not? And then people sometimes have fallen the like wait you forgot to dab like Oh, my bad. Like you. Yeah, it’s just like a fun thing, and it just makes it kind of shows that I don’t take myself too seriously, but it’s just a pattern of recognition that people recognize and it can expect from me on my stream.
spk_0                 
Yes, I think I think that’s extremely important for people to take away is if you confined something unique about you and how you can apply it to your stream like I associate dope sauce with six street music. So I definitely think it needs to cut something like that needs to come naturally. You can’t really enforce it. I mean, obviously, if you have something that you may be your group of friends recognizes you for that’s natural, you can apply that to the stream. But I don’t think you can just try to takes take something like yours and, you know, reverse it with something else. You know, some sort of other sauce or juice or something. Yeah, yeah, you know, that’s a little too forced and constructed. It’s got I mean, the way it came out with you. Naturally, I think that’s extremely important, and that’s how people should try to follow that sort of formula. Don’t force things out with How long were you streaming for before you added dope sauce in
spk_1                 
like a month? Yeah, yeah. So it was just something that, like I started saying and them like I think so In pointed out to me and I was like, Oh, why not just make that part of the stream? I think it’s just like finding those patterns that make you interesting and then making it intentional to add those patterns into your public personality. Like, for example, on a lot of YouTube Ah, couple videos. They will have an intro saying that they always say the same thing every single time. It could be a simple is like, Oh, my name is that my name is so welcome to our video. Pound it like that. That could be the branding thing for a YouTube video. But finding that pattern that people can latch onto that’s natural for you is gonna help make your content more digestible. And they look they look forward to that little moment. You
spk_0                 
know, it’s just like music. If you’re writing a melody or top line, it’s in need some sort of repetition in it. Yes, so people can fall back to it and they’re hearing something that they were like. If you hear one word verse by the second verse, you’re more likely hearing the same melody. And it’s so that there is that feeling of Oh, I’ve heard this. I recognize it. I remember I like this. And then you add a just a little bit of a twist on it to keep it interesting. I feel like it’s the exact same thing. You’ve got to keep a little bit of that repetition in there, so people feel more comfortable with it. One to introduce it.
spk_1                 
Yes, that’s right. It’s 100% the same concept.
spk_0                 
I’m not 100% sure with how subscribing works if it’s kind of the same as patriarch, because I know Patriot has tears for subscriptions. You switch the same way where you get tears as a subscriber.
spk_1                 
Yes, it’s basically the same thing. Twitch has three tiers. There’s a $5 tear, $10 tear and then a $25 tear. But I would say that like 99% of people on Twitter are just doing the regular subscription. The file on the $5.1. Yeah, and how that works is they will no longer get ads on your channel. So as they’re watching, sometimes ads will just pop up if you’re a non subscriber, because Twitch needs to make money so they pay $5.5 dollars a month to get no ads, and then you also get the emotes and every single channel best way to branded channels. While you saw the moat, the dopes, us a move that I made for my channel. Everyone is always right. Yeah, you could make your own face. You could just have, like, hilarious things. They’re usually that people’s faces like the streamer space, cause it’s personalized, you know. But you get access to the moats of that channel for that month that your subscriber so they pay $5 twitch takes half of it. So I see 2 50 of that her month, and it’s not a large sum of money, but for a lot of people, like they have over 1000 subscribers like that’s over two grand. Just like that. That’s to $2500 a month, just from subscribers, because people want to see you there paying for your content.
spk_0                 
That’s people’s entire bills for a month. If you just get Teoh 500 which in That’s exactly why I want to have you on this, because I have no doubt in my mind that in the next couple of years you’ll probably be full time just from your twitch, just because of how fast it’s growing. And that’s why I want to have you on, because it’s it’s possible if you if you play your cards right if you brand yourself well enough, If you’re likable on camera, you can make twitch happen. First of all, it’s fun is hell you can help out a ton of producers, I mean, depending on what you’re doing, but I again I mean, you could monetize it. You can make your living off of doing streams, and you can do it only three times a week, and the rest of the week you can just focus on working on music.
spk_1                 
Twitch is really special because it has all the tipping system and like the subscription, all that system is baked into the system, so it makes it really easy for people to give to the content creator, whereas, like you to, for example, YouTube streams. Currently, I don’t think has a tipping system so people can watch live streams. But you have to tip through 1/3 party system. So it’s not as streamlined. Where is it? Which is all part of it already, where people are able to tip if they want Teoh and you’re able to give them perks of a tip or purpose if they subscribe, whatever it is, it’s all in which, you know,
spk_0                 
people pay for convenience. They want that within the tip system, you’re more likely to get that reward from a fan or subscriber if they’re able to just do it all in one screen, still watch you. As things go on, they don’t have to leave the page. People don’t wanna have to do that,
spk_1                 
and they can see a little notification pop up on the screen like there. Tip or subscription affects the stream, which is like a really cool thing for a lot of people where they can, like, actually add Yeah, they’re like, Oh, your name pops up. This person has subscribed in. Then I’m like, Yo, thanks so much into my little subscription dancing called their name. It’s just fun for people you
spk_0                 
know you places. You play a Snoop jog track when people people subscribe, right?
spk_1                 
Yeah, I have a little stupid dog thing that plays. I do a little like a lame dance Everybody hates. But that’s my sub dad. You gotta deal with it.
spk_0                 
I love it. I love you know, it’s I mean, it’s your brain. It’s just it’s so perfect.
spk_1                 
Twitch. I’ve seen a lot of, like first of the top twitch streamers. It’s crazy the amount of money that they make. So it’s important to recognize that, yes, it is possible to do, ah, lifetime of twitch streaming and make money from it and have a full time income. But it is incredibly hard work and like being being on stream for six hours, eight hours a day, which a lot of the top streamers do, like playing video games and stuff is like That’s a real job one o’clock in like you turn on the personality and you’re basically your own talk show host for eight hours. And like the amount of energy it takes to be the talk show host is a ton of energy for just even two hours. You know, after streams after two hours, I’m like dead. And I would also want to point out that Twitch is largely a very niche audience and even my audience, which is producers and musicians and singers. That’s a niche within a niche, like there’s a like which is not a mainstream thank you to visit mainstream video platform, you know, like there’s way more people that understand but who? No YouTube and twitch, even instagram live streaming is technically like Mawr popular than twitch. Live streaming it supported. Recognize that Twitch is for one very niche audience. And for two largely boys, I would say 90 to 95% of the viewers on twitch Art Dudes Yeah, eso. As a guy streamer. I need to be offering something that’s really, really valuable for people and really entertaining for people to want to tip or subscribe to my channel on. And that’s been actually a challenge of running into recently being a feedback producer or feedback streamer. I I’ve kind of run into a plateau where I feel like I’ve kind of hit my niche pretty well, like I’ve already kind of got my name around the world of twitch that I give feedback. Um, and the growth has actually kind of a total bit. So now I have to think about how Doe I evolve, my content to be relevant to this twitch audience, which is largely younger guys and producers, you know, so something. Think about like you have to give up people want in terms of if you want to make money, doing social media or through life. Sir, may
spk_0                 
I agree 100%? I think that’s a very good topic to bring up or point to make is that as creatives, you have to do that naturally as you progress and grow your career. And I’m actually experiencing that myself right now. I started my studio July of 2018 so it’s almost been a full year, and I just figured out all of my branding stuff about two months ago, three months ago, and I’m hitting this stage where all I’m doing is creating content. Now. I’m just writing articles and posting tips and tricks on my social media pages. I started this podcast. I’ve gotten evil marking list, and they’re all focused on helping producers and helping them grow themselves within their studio. And I’m experiencing the same thing where I’m starting to hit this point where I go. OK, starting toe do a lot of content. It’s building up. There’s a lot of things I need to do, but I need to make sure I’m staying on top my toes. How can I provide more value? How can I do things a little bit differently than what other people are doing? And that’s a natural progression. Everyone plateaus at a point and you have to figure out how you can take that and evolve from that. If you are able to do it successfully, you one, you grow bigger. You grow so much bigger. I guarantee you will almost double your following from that. But not only that, you brand yourself even Mawr. You get niche down into who you are. People start recognizing you as you are a lot more than before because before people are still like well, who is this person? And they’re almost they’re comparing you to someone else. And once you get to that evolved point and grow past that, they start Seeing you is being something completely separate and different from everyone else. And it’s important to get past that growth point because once you can get over it or not, growth point. But I guess it’s a growing pain that you have to experiencing. Get over, and once you do, I mean the success just becomes even bigger and bigger, and it starts to become a lot easier to develop new content or even to apply some things that other people are doing to your stream. But making it Maura about you and more original to what you’re doing and what your brand is.
spk_1                 
I feel like, ah, lot of what my stream has evolved into. Like you said, it’s a lot about finding things that have worked for other streamers that have, like like tuna for their stream like Whoa, that’s a really fun, cool idea. And how do I make that my own? And that’s the same with, like, any sort of creative passion. Even with music like Here’s something in music, you’re like, What in the world was that based on trying to recreate it, like find something that’s working that you find entertaining in a different medium and try to make that your own So I told here you involving
spk_0                 
this is my My listeners are gonna fucking hate me for this, cause I’ve brought it up almost every single episode. Now, have you read steal like an artist?
spk_1                 
No, I’ve heard about it. Made he times them get it. I’d like seven or $8
spk_0                 
on Amazon. I think I’ve said it every single episode. Now it’s exactly what we’re talking about. It’s all about how to steal like an artist, cause every artist steals and it’s not necessarily quote unquote stealing it. You look at all of these different inspirations and all. I mean, if you take 10 or 20 artists and you take one little piece from each one of those artists and you put it into one thing, it’s now something completely new and original that you’ve created that’s important, and it’s okay to do that. And there’s this bad stigma that you can’t do that. But it is. Every artist does it. You’ll hear it everywhere. You’ll hear tracks that remind you of other tracks. Will I guarantee you that producer got inspiration from that other one? It might have stolen either a sound or maybe one of a few notes from a melody and they just heard something in that. And that’s yeah, they heard something and that that they thought they could do something to create something else Very important. Um, and I’m even. I’m starting to have to look at things like that. I go on instagram for a lot of my tips and tricks. I’ll go and look a a lot of the hashtags I post about, like mixing tips or producer tips, and I go in there and I have to find topics to post about tips to give out. And it’s it’s a lot. It’s very easy to go in there and look through stuff and be like, Oh, I didn’t even think about posting about They’re talking about this kind of tip, but someone else posted by I’m like Oh, sure, I could talk about that and you know, I’m not going to steal what they talked about. But I’m gonna take the topic and go into other details that they didn’t talk about that I could help producers apply to their content and their tracks.
spk_1                 
Yeah, I think a lot of producers feel like this guilt about taking someone’s samples or like taking someone’s idea and like evolving from that when, in actuality, I feel like that Gil blocks people from just creating music, you know. So I’m like, I think often producers will trip themselves up the most when you could just be inspired and create something that starts that direction. But by the end, often your music or product is totally different. Like your tips like like your podcast like or like my stream, totally a bunch of ideas that are inspired from other places. But call it inspiration and not stealing, cause it’s like you call it stealing when you start to get on your own case and get it in your own way. I’m like, Whatever. It’s
spk_0                 
definitely I want her purse a great what do you recommend a producer do if they are interested in getting involved with streaming on twitch? If they want to, you know whether they want to show. Maybe they produce one track a week, and that’s what they’re streaming for four hours or something is then producing a track. How what what steps should they take to get involved in that and how do they get started? Because I think that’s you know, that’s the next step to talk about is we’ve talked about how to brand yourself how to be likeable things you can do to differentiate yourself. But what what steps do they need to take to start that journey of getting involved on twitch?
spk_1                 
So I think there are two things that I would recommend. The first is finding your niche product, and the second is a technical aspect of what it takes to actually start streaming on twitch. I’ll start with the niece products. I think this is more important. I think often people will jump onto twitch and think that if they just spend a lot of time on twitch and just like either play a game or if they just, like, sit on twitch for eight hours a day, that is going to met them people who care about their product. But I’ve actually found that spending less time on twitch with the more focus product will get more people interested in actually following your channel and falling what you’re about. I’ve heard of so many horror stories on Twitter, where people will be streaming for two years straight full time streamers. They dream of doing it and they’re playing like fortnight, eight hours a day, hammering away. But like what makes that stream different than just watching Fortnight on YouTube? You know, um, like what makes Twitch unique is the personality like that really is the biggest differentiation between twitch versus any. The platform is that you have the ability to have a real conversation, real personality right then and right there, and they could just chat. You respond right there. That has to be part of your product. And how do you inject your personality, which is your product into whatever you’re trying offer for me? For me, music feedback actual became my main thing because it’s very interactive. I love be ableto hear something and give and take right away, whereas I realized that I want to start twist streaming for D J sets and kind of share sets and whatever and share music. But I realized that those streams were actually getting no views or traction because people didn’t want to show up on their Friday night. So just watch me spin for two hours, and unless you’re already a famous TJ, there’s no reason why they would want to watch you spin for two hours when it’s not interactive. So finding those blocks early on in your twitch or streaming career, what do you want to offer your audience? That’s really, really important in terms of growing your brand. Like there some girls on twitch that just that they’re watching people with you two videos all day and, like respond to people’s YouTube videos and they’ll take donations, submissions for people that drop their own videos or whatever, and their product is entirely there. Look there, A girl on Twitch, which is largely boys. Their product is partially there look, and also partially their responses and personality. That is a product that is entirely their niche end. People flocked to it because it is a relevant product within twitch, right? If you’re a girl, that’s just your relevant because there’s so many boys onto. It is just the way it is. But like as a dude like four, or like as a producer on Twitter, got to be doing music feedback, you could be doing music production streams where you’re just in the dog. But I’ve also found that to be a little bit less engaging as well. But perhaps people want to watch that, you know, like that’s That’s also a niche audience that people just want to watch, how you make music, which is kind of like gaming where you’re doing something else. But people are just watching you do it.
spk_0                 
I I think the important point to make two with producing on Twitch. And it’s something I’ve thought about a lot because, you know, a year or two ago when I was heavily into producing, I was thinking about doing that. Um, and I even tried it a couple times. But the issue with production, especially if you’re alone producing, is you’re not engaging. And that’s the issue someone’s watching. You sit there silent for 10 minutes while you’re bugging some sort of fucking melody or drum loop, and it’s it’s just not interactive. If you can figure out how to be engaging an interactive that entire time while you’re talking to people talking about what you’re doing, your thought process through things and maybe there’s everyone some. While there’s 1 to 2 minutes of silence that might be OK, but you need to figure out how you can be personable and likeable while you’re actually producing
spk_1                 
Yes, that is a strength of twitches, the interactivity of twitch. And unless you’re a famous D J like dead mouse who will sometimes stream his like production stuff, no one’s going to sit there and watch you produce because it’s very one directional. You’re watching your screen. They’re watching you watch the screen. So the product that’s important think about how do you make your live stream interactive fun and responsive for people? And then that could, in terms of music. I thought about a bunch of different ideas, and I’ve figured that feedback is the most direct one. But there’s also beat battles like you could. I could create a 10 tear like 10 people put in $5 then do a beat battle with everybody watching and everyone reaction votes for the best one and the person for that. The very top winds like 50 bucks, you know, like a beat battle. Words like a show like you’re putting on a music show are like you could do a one hour. I’ve seen ah mystery merge to a one hour beat challenge where they hid drags in. Ah, what you call it a sample into discord and then the whole community has one hour to use that sample to create the dope is be like stuff like that was a game show. You can make that interactive, make that really fun. That’s what’s really strong on Twitch. So what do you want to do is a music streamer that’s interactive. That’s fun for people to engage with
spk_0                 
with with producing. I think What really fun Now that I’m thinking about, especially after you’re talking about the B battle, I think what would be extremely fun to do is if you get enough subscribers or followers, What you could do is you could take 10 producers, choose them. I mean, they could either pay, do donation or you can pick whoever you want. But have if they if they are producers have those producers. One person, Rhetta Melody, one, writes a baseline. The other rights of drum Loop and maybe they just all right, 48 bars. And if you want to produce a track, you take what those producers give you and they get to watch you make a track out of what they produced and gave to you. I think
spk_1                 
that’s a great idea. You know
spk_0                 
that could be very interactive. People see what people are seeing, what they created and watching you do something with it. I think that could be extremely fun interactive. So we’re kind of thinking a little narrow minded right now, like there are things that other people have done that we’re talking about. But there are ways that you can step outside the box. Try to think of how you could take something like that. Maybe you do some if you have live since you could do something with that because that could be a lot of fun if people are you know, especially if you have, like, an analog synthesizer and you’re making some wacky ass sounds. That can be a lot of fun. People could be like, Whoa, this is some crazy fucking shit. And you can you can even offer that too. You know, once you’ve let’s say you’ve created some sort of patch and you record the sound, you can actually offer that to your subscribers. So you’re offering free content out and they get got to watch you create it, and you can teach them how you created what you did. So there’s a lot of things you can go into with that. And, you know, a lot of what we’re talking about right now goes exactly into the third episode, which was about how to brand yourself as a producer and you mentioned you known, itching down to what your audiences. This is exactly that I had my buddy Alberto on the last episode, and we talked about how to brand yourself as a producer on Instagram, and you have to start off with who’s your audience. You have to find out where your audience is, what they’re following, what their liking, and the way you do that is it’s set up like a ladder. So you go to the very top. Whoever the top producer is that you follow that you’re inspired by Look at who? Their audiences, who’s following them, what they’re interested in. Now step down the ladder. Who? Someone below that producer find their audience and then stepped down below. That producers well, until you get someone who’s a little bit like, let’s say you have 500 followers on Instagram. Find someone who has 5000 boo. If you’ve walked down the ladder, has the audience that you’re looking for now. What do they like? What are they following now? You know what you need to post about so you can do the same thing with twitch streamers. I mean, if there’s a really big twitch streamer that you like, you work that ladder, find out what their audiences interested and just keep walking it back, and you can figure out what your audiences and with that, you can figure out what it is you can do on twitch to attract that audience and get people in the door.
spk_1                 
Yep, that’s 1% right. Yeah, that’s a really good wayto learn how to brand yourself and kind of work your way up, see what’s working for other people. And you don’t have to create a whole new road just like see what’s working for people who make it your own. Yeah.
spk_0                 
Most importantly, Rome wasn’t built in a day, too. So a lot of this, like we’re talking about a lot of this show, is hard work. It takes time, but you’re dedicated enough. You will come out on top. I mean, you just need to be dedicated and want it.
spk_1                 
Yeah, and be really critical in terms of how you look at the social media atmosphere and adapt to that because it’s changing so fast, the markets always evolving. So one thing that is working might not always work a year from now. But as long as you’re putting in that daily effort and you’re critically addressing how people’s attention are going, and in terms of what is working, what’s not working, then you could adapt and change really quickly. I think the best producers in terms of marketing are the ones that are able to adapt quickly, see what’s not working, cut off, quickly waste number time there and go to where the attention is. The second was talking about earlier. In terms of starting a stream is just a technical stuff. Typical stuff is simply you need a computer that has the power to stream, at least at 7 20 p. Normally shoes air at 10 80 but 7 20 is what I have to downgrade my stream to because I’m just on a Mac book. So with the capturing of my music from a computer and the camera and all the different random effects and gifts and stuff like that, all my screen, my computer’s like pretty maxed out in terms of CPU. It’s running at, like, 80% the whole time during my streams. So getting a computer that is a strong computer and then also any sort of like Webcam is super important for twitch. Like you don’t want to stream on twitch of your novel Webcam. You gotta have something that shows your face and then any sort of decent microphone. So minds 100 bucks but any decent ish micro. It could be a USB microphone, but that just increases the quality of the audio industry. But anything to kind of upgrade the look or the audio on your stream? You don’t. You spend 1000 bucks on microphone like $100 microphones. Probably gonna be fine, but technically, you just need Obi s like as a software, it’s free. It’ll push your video onto you could put on a Facebook. You put it on Twitter, but wherever you like. But that’s your streaming software.
spk_0                 
You do lots of cool things with O. B s. And even in twitch in twitch, you can do overlays and stuff, too, as well, right?
spk_1                 
All my overly stuff comes from stream elements So all of the extra notification of stuff and all the little like, fun, little eye candy that’s on the screen, that’s all from stream elements. And I’ve had really good experience with them. So yeah, that’s honestly all that you need. Just figure out how to use all that stuff, and then you got yourself a stream but streaming like like we’re talking about. It’s really about finding a product that works with people and something that’s enjoyable for you. Um, and it’s gonna be fun. It’s like, That’s the only way sustainable, is it? It’s fun for you. If you’re having fun with it, then you’re really like forcing a stream. And that’s not fun.
spk_0                 
Yeah, that goes into authenticity. I mean, if you’re not having fun, you’re not being yourself. You’re not being authentic, and that’s not gonna You’re not gonna be able to monetize. I mean, Dead Mouse can just cause that’s part of his fucking brand. That’s who he is. He’s he’s a jackass. But, um, you know, a lot of people love it a lot. A lot of people love is sarcasm is very blunt into the point, and it just it works for him again. He’s also he’s dead. Mouse. Well,
spk_1                 
he’s dead mountains. He’s already he’s like, top of the business. So you could do whatever the hell he wants to do.
spk_0                 
Yeah, does not have to act happy on camera whatsoever, because people love everything he does. And, you know, And that didn’t come easy. There’s there. He didn’t that didn’t happen overnight. It was a lot of branding. Ah, lot of hard ass work. And he gets to do that now, just cause that’s where he’s at and it doesn’t like I said, Rome wasn’t built in a day. You gotta You gotta work on it and work on it really, really hard.
spk_1                 
A quick note about twitches I have been thinking about, and I kind of wanted toe talk about real quick. It’s important to recognize the differences between the different social media platforms I’ve been learning recently that which is a great platform from monetizing, but it’s not that great and super great for interactivity, But it’s not that great in terms of search optimization, meaning it is actually pretty difficult if you don’t have a really streamlined product that you’re offering on your stream to grow on twitch. But I’ve been thinking about this recently, even for my own streams. I feel like discovery. Bility is much higher on other platforms and Greta my channels, but growing pretty, pretty decently. It’s solid, you know. But if I had, like, one viral video on YouTube, the search ability on YouTube is incredible. You if you get the number one video for any sort of niche on YouTube, you’re gonna get hits for sure. And I’ve seen a lot of very successful streamers talk about how you you almost want to bring an audience from a more searchable platform onto twitch. So Dead Mouse, for example, his platform is his music. People know him because of his music, so people will watch him on twitch and interact with them because they want to spend time with this person that they’ve already heard about his name, you know?
spk_0                 
Well, he could send one tweet out and get 10,000 people in this stream it And in a minute, yes, and then you can get he can get all those people to follow him on twitch. Really? Yes, it is very important to be have a platform on these other social media.
spk_1                 
Yeah, I almost considered Twitch. Almost like a It’s like has to be in tandem and supplementary to another platform. It’s really hard to just grow solo on twitch. Yes, so in my mind to like, Listen, I my girlfriend, we just started a couple of channel on YouTube just for that reason, you know, just to get more eyeballs on our faces, Um also were costed pushing out music. And also we have Instagram’s, you know, like we’re pushing Instagram like crazy to be able to bring more people onto twitch but which I think is a supplementary. It has to be intended with other things. It’s really hard to grow on twitch solo. You know,
spk_0                 
you have to be able to promote your twitch stream to get people indoor because, like you said, it’s not easy to discover someone on twitch unless, let’s say your fault. You’re Ari. Following 10 streamers are involved in electronica music. Sure, you might pop up in their feed one day, whenever you’re streaming and they’ll discover you, then I’m sure that’s starting to happen. That doesn’t happen right away. It won’t happen because you have to get within twitches algorithm or you to start popping up there, and I’m sure that has a lot to do with subscribers and followers and what they’re following and watching. So how do you go about promoting your twitch stream on these social media platforms?
spk_1                 
I try to be the least spammy as possible. Yeah, I think it’s really easy to be like, Hey, disaster three times a week, it’s really easy. Just the post three times on all my social platforms like Hey, I’m streaming. The way I do it now is I will clip the best parts of my tweet stream and my reactions. And I’ll post those reactions on my Facebook or my instagram story. Whatever Jessica people intrigued about like Oh, he’s like actually a twitch streamer like he’s actually doing stuff on Twitch, and it’s a lot more visual. It’s a lot more fun than just getting a little tweet that says, Hey, I’m live could come check me out, you know, um, but cross promotion is really, really important, but a lot of my growth has not been from my friends and organic like friends. Like fans from my Facebook page has been largely from people talking about the stream with their friends like strangers. You know, like there was a period of time in, like, two months or three months into my stream was one guy that was part of this collective called MBM Crew, and this is like randomly popped in my stream. And then he invited the rest of his entire producer gang and always said in an extreme, it was popping off like 35 people. And I’m like, What in the world just happened? Why’s the entire like collective here? But it really is. If you’re stream is fun, they will tell their friends about it. And word of mouth is the best marketing. You, of course, want to plug yourself. You wanna promote yourself on our channels like without, it’s not expanding. You want to be relevant with your promotion. But the best marketing is, honestly, just word of mouth from other people because it gets it doesn’t sound self promotion. E. It sounds like my friend likes it, so therefore, I’m gonna go natural. Check it out. It’s weight.
spk_0                 
It’s organic. It’s all organic traffic. It’s the same thing. If you’re running an audio engineering studio, you don’t make your money off of doing a bunch of cold outreach and reaching out to a bunch. Producers. You don’t know you. You make your money by building relationships with your clients and them turning into a referral machine for you. Yes, they go often. Tell your producers Yo, I’m working with this mixing engineer. He’s so awesome, he goes above and beyond these really nice supercool guy. Go check him out. If you got track that you need mixture mastered, Go, go here. That’s how you build revenue and how you can actually go full time is an audio engineers. It’s all based on your clientele bays turning into a referral machine. It’s the same way what it sounds like. It’s the exact same way with Twitch.
spk_1                 
Yeah, you want to think about offering the best product possible so that people cannot help but talk about it like they’re like, Man, I hang out with hanging with Richie every Friday night from 68 oclock, and it’s a blast. You know, you gotta come in to check it out sometime. It’s fun and, like they’re way more likely to check that. Then my friend who saw my little tweet like Hey, I’m live I
spk_0                 
think it’s extremely important to do a clip to like, I really I really like seeing those cause I’ll see those pop up every once in a while would clip from the last stream or something. And if I missed the stream, I get to see, like the coolest highlight on and in that goes into what we were talking about before with people like seeing faces. If you’re promoting with a piece of video content, they’re much more likely to get engaged with that content. Sherritt Comment like on it and watch it and enjoy it so much more.
spk_1                 
Yeah, Putting your face out there, I think, is like the number one marketing tool that you can use. That’s what that is. Your brand is your face, and it doesn’t miss 1/2 of your face. It could be a mask, you know. But if you’re streaming on, twitch is probably gonna be your face like use your face and all your promotion anytime post about like any sort of music related thing. I always put a picture of my face with, like a head shot or something that looks nice because people people are scrolling down. They see my face first, and they see me smiling, like happy or excited about something. And all of a sudden they read like, Oh, my e p got number whatever and be poor and like That’s a more important news, but they don’t care about the news until they see your face. Let’s get a little bit
spk_0                 
into the topic of about the community you’re building, because that is so important with becoming successful in Twitch is building this sense of community again with the repetition of things that you’re talking about within the stream, branding, Um, and then when you’re going live so you know you’re going live three Days week every Sunday, Tuesday and Friday at 6 p.m. Pacific time. That’s very important. So you have that repetition within your schedule of streaming the repetition of things that you’re talking or doing within the stream for branding with the dope sauce and dabbing and all that and with this builds this sense of community where people no one to come onto the stream, they know exactly when you’re going to be live. They know what to expect, and they’re super excited about that. So you start building this community and you decided to go the route of creating a discord server, which I think is just fucking great. More producers need to do it because it’s a great way to build a sense of community. People can talk to each other within the community without you having to be involved, but they’re still within your server. So it’s still almost branding you in yourself. I just love the sense of community that you’re building. So how did you come up with the idea for building a discord server?
spk_1                 
Um, discourse. So that is kind of like what we’re talking about stealing like an artist. Um, where I saw a bunch of other streamers who were way more successful than me, and they all had discourse servers, and I don’t I didn’t really understand why they had it, but I’m like I should probably have one because they keep inviting people to the discord server. So I just made one, and I had no idea how to run it. I had just one channel in there originally, and there was this one guy who popped up in my stream early on. His name was gonna and he was like, Hey, I started discourse over sucks. Do you want to make it better somehow? Like I could make it better for you. I’m not really gonna discordant I’m like, please take it and run with it. And then he created, like, all these different bots and like this welcome system and stream notification just like that. And it all
spk_0                 
level up systems bad as
spk_1                 
I have no idea. It’s so quick. It doesn’t do anything. It just makes you feel good leveling up its interactive. It’s just it’s interactive and I love
spk_0                 
it all level up. I’m like, Yeah, three. Now I don’t It doesn’t mean shit, but I’m
spk_1                 
level three, actually. If any other stream or server has that bought in their your level three in that stream to so like, it’s basically just like discord wide bought that you could keep lovely open. It’s just like a fun thing. You know? It makes the whole thing a game, So yeah, discord has its own ecosystem that I am still trying to navigate myself. People basically they have, like, kind of I almost consider, like someone has given you their email list are start giving you their email to be part of your email. This they’ve kind of subscribed into your channel enough to be like, Oh, I enjoy this guy. I want to hear about his updates on his life. So
spk_0                 
discord doesn’t change either. That’s what’s important.
spk_1                 
Yes, yes, that’s right. So it’s like they’re discord. And if I don’t want to do a big blast to all the people in the 60 FAM, I just do ah at everyone. And then everybody gets a little notification that, like I am going to be late for my stream or early, I could talk to everybody, you know. So I’m essentially treating it like an email list. But it’s a very special email list because, like you said, there are different channels for feedback to retails for conversation. And that is something that I’m still trying to grasp in terms of, like, how much do I try to connect with people on the discord? I think people are willing to, but even I haven’t totally tapped into how much you could actually do there, you know, because if people spend a lot of time in the six treat fam discord, then there by kind of their reminded of 63 every single day. If I’m talking to them every single day through this medium, like they’re having a connection with me every single day, and that’s important for just repetition and establish that
spk_0                 
relationship, it’s building a community. And that’s what it’s all about with your fans is you gotta build this sense of their part of this bigger group that other people aren’t a part of. And they they feel special in that group, especially if they’re interacting with the producer that they’re a fan of. And they follow and they want to learn more about, especially if they want to learn more from you. It’s important for them to feel this sense of connection and pride when they get toe work with you and interact with you within that discord server. And while you’re streaming
spk_1                 
yeah, and I think it’s so cool. Whenever I see a little notification that someone’s like sharing about their weekend or share with life in the discourse server and I’m not like my discourse, there is not like popping off like some other people’s. I’m like Sometimes I go server people are just hanging out all day, and the server and other streamers discords, But for mine. Whenever I get a notification that, like someone just shared about like how they got kicked out of their house or like someone shared about like man, this is like, I just create a new song. I’m so excited to share it And they just wanted to tell the community that I’m like, Whoa, this is actually like a place where people want to come in post stuff, you know? And even that’s so blows my mind. And it’s really cool to see how it’s growing to that point.
spk_0                 
Yeah, it’s awesome. I really love it, man level you do with the discord server. I love what you’re doing on Twitch. It’s just it’s also great. It’s an and I can just I can see it being wildly successful. I I have no doubt in my mind that this is something that you could definitely go full time with. And ah, I’m excited to see it expand even more because I have a feeling it’s gonna It’s gonna blow a fairly big It’s gonna be a lot of fun to to see it.
spk_1                 
Yeah, I appreciate that. I think the bread and butter of my stream is gonna be feedback, but I’ve been thinking about, like, taking it on the road cause I travel for choreography, jobs and whatnot. So if I go back to India this year for the job like I want to get a WiFi system and I r L stream just be walking around India, like all of a sudden, you opened up a whole new audience to your face and your stream that, like, they’re like watching a travel stream. Now, you know, um or like if I started playing more live shows, I’ve taken them backstage with me like my stream backstage and just talking about how I’m feeling right before the show, like, that’s all relevant producer talk, you know, more real life stuff, but I think the bread and butter is still gonna be the feedback. But I’m thinking about like, How do I expand? How like row? How do I adapt to the ecosystem of twitch?
spk_0                 
Yeah, it’s important, too, to know. I mean, you’re almost at 700 followers and not all those air producers. A lot of those are people who just like watching they like watching and hearing other producers tracks and understand. Maybe they want to be producers. But, you know, I guarantee a big number of those are just fans of yours. And if they get mawr interaction with that I rail stuff, I’m sure they love to see that even more so than watching feedback stuff. So it’s, you know, it’s important to get creative in that sense and, um, share more about your life and what you’re doing. And that’s it’s perfect for your YouTube Channel two that you’re doing with Liz. Because, ah, it’s something that your fans can interact with more. They can get more insight into your life. And that’s what it’s all about. Is interacting and sharing your journey with those fans.
spk_1                 
Yeah, that’s right. It’s like this whole. This whole process of this whole like journey is being documented, and people looking to see the development of you as an artist, not only with your music but also with your life as well. And I think that’s really, really important.
spk_0                 
Awesome. Will Ah, do you have anything to plug? I mean, obviously you wanna plug your stream. Do you have any? I know you just had an e p that release that you’re a part of. Are you planning Show soon?
spk_1                 
Yeah. Um, so the artist product that I go by is called Six Street with the number 66 th Space street. Um, and these days, I’m actually really hoping toe grow my Spotify account. So if you as like, on Apple Music or Spotify, you confined six street on all of those platforms. And I just released a official remix on Friday to my friend Daniel Simmons. Track guard on. I’m really, really happy with how that one turned out and yeah, it’s that’s been the main
spk_0                 
looking unrealized do. Thank you. You said it to be last night. I was like, Let me go fucking buy this shit. I bought it. I just went straight to your track. Was like, Whoa,
spk_1                 
holy shit. By festival, future basic chords like I’m a huge fan of that stuff.
spk_0                 
It’s a banger. I need to connect you with my buddy Noah. Neiman, um who does future based stuff and, um, very similar to the things you’re doing. I think you two could fucking make a banger of attract
spk_1                 
dude. 100% connect May. Yeah. Um, but yeah. If you guys want to my music. It’s gonna be on Spotify or on Apple music. Look up Six Street and I’m working on a new E p with my friend Leo. He’s a phenomenal singer. Probably releasing that in the next month or two. So, yeah, I’m really, really excited. Keep making more music and keep shared. Yeah, the history if you look up six street music with no spaces, um, it’ll pop up on their if you have any tracks you guys want to just send in for feedback. That’s the place to check it out. I am online Sunday Tuesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m. Pacific Time to
spk_0                 
awesome. Well, thank you so much for try. Appreciate you taking the time. And, uh, yeah, we’ll have toe. I can’t wait to go back in the stream tomorrow And we can hang out and listen to some good tunes because it’s
spk_1                 
it’s always just want to say thank you for having me on the podcast. Then whenever you’re on the stream, yours, they’re giving the best advice. And I’m like, yes, and these audio is here like we’re gonna have a good stream cause you were there. So thanks for being there, man.
spk_0                 
Yeah, man. Thank you. I appreciate it. All right. Will you take care? Do
spk_1                 
our man much love talk to save?
spk_0                 
Alright, guys, Thank you so much for tuning into this episode of electronic dance money. I really enjoyed making this episode. It was a ton of fun, as always. You can head to envious audio dot com slash podcast to check out the show Notes. I’ll put up all the links to riches, social media profiles, his twitch stream, his Spotify account. You’ll build toe Look, all that stuff up there and everything else that we talked about in the show. Feel free to email me podcast at envious audio dot com. Let me know what you think of the show. There’s any guests you’d like me to have on, or if there’s a specific topics you’d like me to talk about again, I would really appreciate it if you headed over to apple podcasts and when in Raided, reviewed and subscribe to show Thank you so much. And I’ll see you guys
 
 

Recent Episodes

Want to help support the show? Leave a usefull review of the podcast, and let me know what you think!