The Importance of Mentorship

Blogs, forums, subreddits, and just about any other online resource can only take you so far.

At some point, you need a physical human being to really take you to the next step. Someone who has been in your position and can tell you exactly what your next step should be

This is where mentorship comes into play. Mentorship is so vital in our industry, it’s usually a free educational source that can take you beyond your means of internet education.

The value that you get from sending someone a quick IM to help you work on issues in your track, marketing, branding etc. is so valuable, that it might be priceless.

My guest today is Cameron Bashaw, from Neologic Studios. Cameron has been in this game for 15+ years. He’s a producer, audio post engineer, mixing engineer, mastering engineer, graphic artist, and much more. Name a creative job in our industry and I guarantee Cameron has done it.

Both Cameron and I have been mentors and mentees. We know the struggles of both and we’re here to teach you how to nail the perfect mentor and where to go from that point.

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • How to approach a mentor
  • What kind of mentorship you should look for
  • What mentorship can do for you
  • How to provide value to a mentor
  • Where to find a mentor

and so much more!

Episode Links

 

Neologic Studios – http://www.neologicstudios.com

Gravitas Create Community – https://www.facebook.com/groups/gravitascreate/

The Six Figure Home Studio – http://www.thesixfigurehomestudio.com

Chris Graham – http://www.chrisgrahammastering.com

Brian Hood – https://www.456recordings.com/

Automatic Episode Transcript — Please excuse any errors, not reviewed for accuracy

 
Hey, guys, welcome to electronic dance money. You’re number one business resource for making money as electronic musicians and producers. All right, welcome to the second episode of electronic dance Money. And today my guest is Cameron Boucha. You’re the owner of New Logic Studios, where you produce mix and master for Elektronik producers. You also do some marketing consulting a little bit of your background. You come from an audio post background. Now what’s that like? Because I don’t know a lot about that world.
spk_1                 
It’s very fast paced. Definitely you gotta I’ll have a project come in and it’s in and out within, like, six hours or a day in, depending on, because it’s just you’re working on commercials, very short form audio. So it’s quick and easy, but you gotta know your stuff because they want it quick. Turnaround
spk_0                 
for commercials. I mean, are you working on like, a minute long commercial?
spk_1                 
Yeah, that it depends on the like the budget of the size of the contract that I get, but for the most part, it’s between 30 or 60 seconds, and then they might do cut downs, or they might do alternates, so you might have one commercial quote unquote. But within that project, there might be multiple deliver, you know, deliverables that they’re gonna ask for. And, uh, I ate the most. I delivered. I had ah, one project that was just I was just doing the mixing and a little bit of sound effects in there and then mastering it. But we had 33 deliverables and I turned it around in six hours.
spk_0                 
Geez, wow. Yeah, it’s a lot like pitch correction. Pitch correction is the same thing where people are looking for quick, fast turn around and they’re looking for someone who can do it as fast as possible. But get the best results. Those people always come out on top. In terms of that eso let’s go a little bit more into your background. How didyou get started in Elektronik music? How’d you get into mastering, producing, mixing? What brought you into this world? And how how have you been able to kind of stay in it?
spk_1                 
Um, and that’s it’s such a messy journey. I’ll tell you that because they’ve just been I’ve been all over the place like I’ve warned so many different hats. And so for me, I started probably just before high school, like I had computers all my life from my friends or video game nerds and stuff, and we don’t play games together. But eventually it evolved time like I wanna be able make music by high school. I started getting into guitar in around that time I got my first recording interface, so I was messing around with software, and at the time I was learning like Aston 2.0, which is like just just that. The advent of loops loops were just becoming a thing back then, right? And that was the mainstay of, like asking two point. Oh, is you could just take loops and start composing like a track since the building blocks. Basically, it was like Legos for music that’s crazy. And then V. ST’s came out within a few years. I remember, like, 99 or 2000 and I started getting into those. They started getting implemented into acid, and I started discovering, like reason and reason was just an insane different beast altogether. Like the fact that you could like visually rewire things with Iraq, it was just so intuitive.
spk_0                 
Yeah, I made you feel like you were actually messing around with analog gear. But just on your computer,
spk_1                 
that for me, is that’s what started like me down the rabbit hole. So by the time I had finished high school, I probably had just over 300 personal recording projects. Just experiments like and they were They were shitty there. I still have them, but they’re good reminders of like, Hi. This is where that’s where I’ve come from.
spk_0                 
Oh, man, Yeah, I’ve got a couple of those where I go back and I’m like, Poof. What was I thinking before I even realized what a mix was? Mastering waas?
spk_1                 
Yeah, I’m just discovering all that stuff. By the time I uneven exited high school, I’m just, like, barely discovering Like what a compressed er is how e cues work where I started no fundamentals of like, this is what they’re doing or how they what, what they’re actually doing to the signal. And so for me, my passion going out of school was that I’d been doing as diverse. I was doing many things. I was painting, drawing, sculpting, But and so in college, my first major that I declared was graphic Arts because I love visual arts at Livadia Live Music. Um, I was doing a lot of stuff all over the place that wasn’t really sure what I want to do about it, passions and all that stuff. So my first degree ended up being inhumanity just to get General Ed out of the way. And then, stepping into the world of recording, I went straight from one community college to another. I was checking out like expressions, College of time. They were like $62,000 for a two year advanced bachelors, and I was just like, No, that was like and that was 2005. They weren’t even accredited yet, and we checked out in a couple other ones like Chico State. And then I was living up north about Central Valley area at the time. And, um, way found lost Madonna’s College, which is out in Pittsburgh. It’s near Antioch. It’s near Berkeley, and they actually had a really good recording arts program and their studios, one of the better rated ones in the entire western half of the U. S. For a community college that speaking volumes, I jumped right, and I was like, Yeah, recording. I love audio of music. So I went straight from one degree in visual arts, too. Decree in Recording Arts And by 2007 the whole industry had shifted like everything was pretty much just all about video games like Game audio, interactive audience. They weren’t even like doing audio related stuff. You were just programming on scripting. He had to learn video game, get to learn programming language. Basically, there was still a lot of stuff going on in the field at the time for other things, like had applied at Pixar. Actually had a lead through my instructor at the time who helped me. He’s like, Hey, stay back after class. I want to chat with you It’s He offered me an opportunity before they even went public with the position for audio video engineer position at Pixar’s main Emeryville studio. And I thought that was really cool from there. I just I kept plugging in. There’s a lot of stuff in the day, but there’s not really a whole lot outside of their. So living in the Central Valley have to commute was just getting really expensive. So I started turning more to remote stuff And that’s where I met a couple of my friends through some mutual acquaintances, and they had moved from Antica to L. A and started a production company. So next thing I know I’m getting commercial were through them. They’re doing big budget stuff, these air pretty standard rates that they’re doing with creative labs is that like the people who make SoundBlaster technology and, you know, we’re shooting several commercials for them. The first about how the gate they had one, they just had me do audio post for it. It’s like a quick 1200 bucks, because that’s six hours and 33 deliverables later, I’m 1200 bucks. Richard. I just said I’m done for the week, you know? But that’s the other thing about the industry is when it comes to that kind of stuff. If one goes belly up, where how many other connections can feed your work? That was my hard lesson is, you know, I was sitting pretty doing full time just freelancing up until that dry spell where it’s just that that business just cut right off and I didn’t have. I didn’t have any other connections to lead me back into it. So it’s been a struggle, and that’s kind of right relocating me. Teoh. So Cal has kind of just spit balled into where I’m at now.
spk_0                 
And what what year was that That you were getting into the commercial stuff? 2012. That was 2012. So how many years were you actually working on audio Post?
spk_1                 
About 2015 says about Okay. Three solid years? Yeah, where I was mostly full time at freelancing and to the point where I’d even just left all my other part time jobs and was just straight working from home
spk_0                 
that when you started to kind of see that transition come in where you’re not picking up as much commercial work as you were in the past Is that kind of is that when you start to transition into working on more mastering stuff within Elektronik music, what drew you really to electronic music? Was it that your base of when you were in high school working and acid?
spk_1                 
Yeah. Yeah, So there’s It’s kind of like I said, it’s a diverse, messy journey. So all the while, while I’m working on my part time jobs, you know, like it best by had a buddy of mine that was super into, like rapping and writing hip hop lyrics. This is back in 2009 where I met him and we just kind of on the side just for fun. At night we’d start, I’d make a beat, he’d be riding and then within, like an hour or two. We have a song flushed out. We pumped out stuff, but we wouldn’t be putting any where we just were doing it for fun. We were thinking about like, Okay, let’s put this out. But it started to evolve into almost what, 10 years later, we’ve got a brand strategy. We’ve got a name that we really like and want to stick with them. You know, there’s there’s a message to It’s at the core of all the songs. They have a message or meaning, and so we really like that strategy won’t move for with that, so we’re starting to get stuff published. But yeah, that’s that’s just it’s been a long journey, and it started Teoh around the same time that I had lost my production leads. For all the audio stuff. I started getting back in touch with the local community up north where I was. And there’s a lot of local music acts that were quite diverse that was dealing with a glam rock band. One point eso. I produced a lyric video for them. I helped them do a lot of, like, administrative stuff, you know, help Their manager learned about the publishing side of business, how to file copyrights and you just crossing their ts, dotting their I’s sort of thing and learning how to be a business. And that’s where I started developing to this consulting thing. That it because a lot of artists don’t understand that that’s
spk_0                 
a big thing that I deal with two as well. Um, in my studio, when I’m mixing, mastering, I get a lot of clients who are. They’re They’re not super new to producing. They’re still young in their careers, and they don’t know a whole lot about artists, development, branding, creating content and consistently putting out that kind of content. So I’m actually I’m doing the exact same thing. A lot of these producers I bring in, and I kind of helped them throughout their the lead up until they’re released. So whatever track they’re having, the mixer Master, I’m going. Okay. Well, what are you doing with this track? Are you sending it to a record label? Are you wanting to self distribute? Because I can guide you along that entire path and help you out with that with that whole situation?
spk_1                 
Well, even if you look at the way that the labels back in the day, the labels were the gatekeepers, right? And there was 1/4 toe like, Hey, everybody had a role. Everybody had a specialty. You would have a songwriter is just a songwriter, like all the stuff that Elvis put out those air songwriters, that he was just the performer, but he was the mainstay was the front man of the of that talent. And nowadays, technologies made everything so accessible to everybody. It’s really lowered the bar. It’s it’s democratized our entire industry. So the doors are blown wide open. Anybody can come in, but at the same time, it helps if you have people on your team that know how to guide you through that next staff. I think
spk_0                 
a lot of producers have this stigma in their head that they need to do it all. They need to be it all, and that’s it. They need to do all the mixing they need to do the mastering they need to do. The promo they need to design their own cover are all of that. And they’re taking away from everything that they’re wanting to dio and putting so much time and energy into something that they can hire someone to do. Or if they make the right connection, someone will help them either connect them with someone to do that, or they will be able to do it for them. And they can just focus on what they love, which is the song writing and producing, Right? Right. Let’s dive into some of the topics of today’s episode, which is about mentor ship I reached out to you. What was it probably a month ago or so looking for People have either been a mentor or they are a mentee. Just anyone, Really. It’s really interesting because I never I saw myself as being someone knowledgeable in this field at all, because I’ve always been the mentee. I’ve always had a mentor. Since I started producing, I’ve had a mentor that was showing me how to do everything and teach me to do things Over the years, I’ve kind of seen myself like slowly creep up to their level and I stopped learning as much as I feel like I should, and then all of a sudden there’s just this change, this transition out of nowhere. I went from mentee to mentor where I’m actually teaching people. I’m doing lessons on mixing and mastering. I think being a mentor is just as good as being a mentee because you’re learning like when you’re teaching someone you are having to describe what you’re doing, and you have to describe it in a way where someone who doesn’t know what they have to understand it. And it’s complicated stuff. A lot of the things that we deal with in the studio, and I started realizing, Oh, I’m understanding a lot of these things that I didn’t think I really understood. Once I explain them, I’m starting to come up with these analogies I go that actually works. Oh wow. Now I’m really starting to understand this, and even more so, my mentee, their their faces going Oh my Lord, they’re just popping and lighting up because they’re making a connection and I just I remember being in that position, and it’s it’s just such a great position to be in when you’re learning something. All of a sudden it clicks when someone shows it to you,
spk_1                 
right? And that’s the funny thing about mentorship. I think it’s I’ll say this. I don’t know if it’s it might be both, but I don’t know if it’s just the fact that it’s the way creatives approach life. Or if it’s just that we’re seeing this so much in modern society right now. But we feel like we have to reinvent the wheel like we have to do everything ourselves. We have to do it from scratch. We can’t learn the prostate, you we can’t find the successful formula other people already doing successfully because obviously that formula works. But why are we why aren’t we going after them to just learn from them? Have you read steal like an artist? I have not. But you’ve mentioned that before and I think that was that’s a key proponent that they’re pushing behind it, right?
spk_0                 
Yes. So steal like an orders is amazing. I highly I mean, that book transformed my world, especially how I developed content. He talks about this one thing where you create an analog station in a digital station. Your analog one are actually drawing everything in designing it and working with your hands. And then you transform that into the digital space. Um, that was the biggest thing. I got the book, but the main premise behind it is artists steal. That’s what they do. They steal from other artists. But there’s a way to do it where you’re not plagiarizing. I’m not going into your portfolio, and I’m grabbing your track and putting it out and putting my name on. That’s not what the story of the book is about. It’s more so. Study. These artists figure out what they’re doing and get inspiration from them and take from multiple artists. Take from 10 artists. Take things, little things that they’re doing. Take it, put it in your own pieces of work because if you steal from 10 people and put it in your own thing, you’ve now developed an original piece of content that no one else has created. Just use these other artists how you take a little bit from them. You’re not taking all of your taking little pieces to develop your own original piece of content. The biggest example that I can show is sounds presets. So many producers are afraid to use presets from wherever they’re getting them. Um, and they feel like they need to design every single little sound they need to go out and record them hitting Iraq and take that into the studio and design and kick out that That’s fun. It’s great. I definitely think there are sessions where you should be working on sound designed to kind of understand how your sounds are working. But when you’re in the studio and you’re wanting to create and be a creative and you’re going to get a song out, that’s high quality as quick as possible presets or the best way to
spk_1                 
go presets loops, you need
spk_0                 
committee. No one’s gonna know that you’re using a preset pack from this one producer who made it three years ago. No one’s looking for that. I don’t want to
spk_1                 
hear more consumer. The person who’s listen. The song isn’t going to care, especially if this song was constructed effectively and they resonate. If it resonates with them, they’re not gonna care.
spk_0                 
But anyways, finding a mentor, though, who can teach you these things and provide assets to you in value to you where you’re learning, Um, from people that they’ve learned from in the knowledge that they’ve accumulated over, you know, 10 15 20 years. That’s massive. I mean, there is There might not be anything more valuable than having a mentor who has been in the scene. They’ve been through it all, and they have seen it all in having that value of education. I mean, especially with today in the Internet. I mean, it’s insane how fast you can not only find a mentor, but talk to them, ask questions and get answers on that. You could be in the studio working on something, have an issue, message them, and within 10 15 minutes they could give you an answer. Whereas 20 years ago that was not around, you could post on forums, but you might not get an answer for a day or two. You might not even get a good answer for a week,
spk_1                 
and that’s that’s the effect of what technology has done for us in this generation. So let me paint the picture. If you are to just being a complete vacuum, right? There’s nothing around. There’s nobody around and you start experimenting. You like What is my sound? I want to find my sound. You can toil a room for years playing with steering, playing with massive playing with your dog and you. You will evolve for sure, and you’ll find stuff. But if you find a mentor and let’s say, for example, photography, let’s take photography as an example. Back in the day before digital, you’d have toe fiddle with the settings, right, and then you don’t even get to see the result of that. You’re just looking for through the viewfinder, which is going through the lens. You’re not even seen the effect of the output of the film, and you have to go get it developed. You have to get enlargement done. There’s a huge process behind that. If you’re doing it yourself. This is called the feedback loop of the feedback cycle. So the length of time that it takes to get a result to know whether you even took a good picture, not whether the composition was good. You look at it. This is too far to the left. I didn’t frame it right. It’s too dark. It’s too light. It’s too washed out anything. It takes days now. It might take hours for, like, you know, a pro photographer. But then Digital came out, the DSLR came out, and that revolutionized photography forever. Why? Because the second you snapped the picture, you could see the results instantly on the screen. And no, Did I take a good enough picture? I need to retake that one. And so that that feedback cycle went from days two hours to mere fractions of a second. It’s instantaneous. So if you look at that in terms of music, production or growth, you if you want to grow as a producer, a mentor is going to help accelerate that feedback cycle.
spk_0                 
Hey, hey, technology has changed everything. I mean, the fact that you can befriend someone on Facebook who’s been in the industry for as long as it’s been around and you can ask questions, they can give you answers instantaneously. I mean, that’s just there’s so much value in that. Let’s talk about looking for a mentor because that’s, I think, the biggest struggle with a lot of producers.
spk_1                 
So if we look at it from the three parts that you know that we’ll break it up into three parts. Still, like what can? Obviously, what could mentorship do? And then I would even go further to say, identifying a good mentor because let’s take Let’s take it from experience like, Hey, if you reached out to your parents for parenting advice, there’s a chance. Bring a chance. They’re gonna have good advice because their experience with that. But most people with the working class family. If you go to your parents for business advice, they may not be the best person to go to for business advice because they haven’t successfully built a business. So looking for the right person for the right thing that your looking toe learn I step number one is be clear with yourself about what you want toe learn or what you’re looking for, and that will help you identify who might be a good mentor to go to. Then all it is is just step Number two is like looking for the mentor. So, yeah, if we’re looking for mentors, um, I mean, we take, for example, you know, the six figure homes to your podcast Chris Graham. He learned from dentistry. You can look for somebody in a different industry, doesn’t have to be in the same industry.
spk_0                 
I think you hit a really good point there, which is finding a mentor for what you’re what? What are you wanting to do? If you’re a producer and you’re going to be, you wanna be busting out tracks, you won’t be putting out albums Spring out. BP’s won’t be a touring artist if if that’s what you’re wanting to dio, I think the next step up would be to find someone who’s done that or is on their way to doing that. Like if you’re wanting to be because I know a couple of people who are producers who want to be audio engineers, they’d rather mix and master, And so from that point you don’t really want to find a producer that’s going to teach you that cause they’re working on something else. They’re working on putting out tracks, trying to network B A. D. J. Getting shows. So if you wanted to be a mixing engineer, an audio engineer, you’re obviously gonna find someone who’s doing that because they can teach you the INS and outs and they’ll go into the business side of things.
spk_1                 
Let’s start with Justin Exercise like Who’s your hero? If you look at it as a producer, my hero is virtual right or excision. You name it whoever is up top. Obviously, we’re looking at the very top of the industry. These guys have massive appeal. They’re globally known. Of course, that name is gonna be a household name with the stuff that were involved in for electronic music. Those guys are huge. Or you could go way back when you reach out to Tiesto or Beatty or you name a TBI. But if those air your heroes, that doesn’t mean they’re off the list. But they might be really hard to get a hold of, especially if you’re nowhere near them. And, yeah, the Internets a great place. But sometimes the limited Communication avenue, the channel of communication. If is limited, it might be harder to get their attention, especially because in this day and age they’re probably getting Justus much noise as you’re having to sift through to reach them.
spk_0                 
Definitely. The more I’m involved in the industry, the more I realize everything is a very slow climb. It’s the same with your mentors. Um, I’ll explain this a little bit more. When I first started producing, that was back in 2013. I think it was. And I met my first mentors who were called Rubicon seven at the time. And then they eventually change their name to our seven. It was a husband and wife duo, and I remember I was talking to a promoter in town. This is what I was in Boise, Idaho. I was talking to, ah, promoter trying to get shows, and I was sending him some tracks I was working on. We ended up hanging out, and then he’s like, let me connect you with these, um, these guys, they’re they’re great. They and I’ve heard their music before, too, and I actually I actually saw them. When Tiesto came to Boise, they opened up for show. Nice. Um, I remember he was telling me he’s going to introduce me to them, And I was like, Holy shit, I knew who they’ve had. Big fucking tracks. Most almost. I think every single weather releases has been on the top 10 release top five releases on Be
spk_1                 
porous. They are seven sounds really familiar.
spk_0                 
There were putting out good music and their ship was always going to the top of the charts. It was great, and but they weren’t huge. They weren’t touring. They didn’t have an agency behind them. They weren’t managed by anyone that were doing all the stuff themselves, so they weren’t out of my means. I’m sure if that promoter wasn’t there, I know I could have message them on Facebook, and they would have given me a response because I was a local in town. If you’re I mean anywhere. I was in Boise, Idaho. That’s a small place, man. It’s not that big. Everyone knows everyone. Um, I think the metro area is like 500,000 or 700,000 people, but in Boise, it’s like 200,000. Wow, so it’s not. It’s big, but it’s not that big. Connect with people locally because if you can and this goes into, if you’re wanting to deejay, where you going to start? You’re gonna start locally. You’re not going to start in a city that’s 2000 miles away. That’s not where you’re getting booked. That’s going t supposed to travel. Exactly. You’re going to get booked locally. So what you want to do is look for those producers who are above you who are in the scene. They’re playing shows. If you can figure out how to connect with them, that’s going to be your best shot for getting your first mentor, and that’s going to start bringing you up notches. You’re going to start leveling up from there and getting better and better in your dando seeing your productions, and that’s going to transition online. Two people are gonna hear that they’re gonna like it, and then you can slowly move up from there eventually, what happened with my mentors is I got to a point where I just wasn’t learning a whole lot from them and we became or more friends than anything. That’s what it turned into. It just turned into a really good friendship, and from that point on I actually found another mentor, which is Noah Neiman, whose guy here in Austin. And he’s I mean, he’s toured with Try Tonal before released on Armada revealed Amada’s here and direct. Yeah, he’s I mean, he’s released on big, big, big labels. Amanda. He’s local. Here’s the thing is I went from in Boise, I got a local mentor ship there. I moved away toe. Austin and I was on a different level than I was in Boise. So I needed to find someone who could pull me up even higher than that. And it started out with a message on Facebook. That’s exactly how that mentor ship started out. I was. I went and saw Try Tonal. He was opening the show, and I just sent him a message. Found his personal Facebook. I said, Hey, I love the show. You killed it. He messaged me back Within, like, 30 minutes is like, Thank you so much, I appreciate it. And then I told him, Hey, would you mind if I just sent you some tracks every once a while to get some feedback? He said, No problem. Yeah, any time. And that’s how it started. Starting tracks he started Give me feedback, and from there you see your progress. Now it’s time to find another mentor who’s above that. Who could bring me even further,
spk_1                 
right? Climbing the ladder? Yeah, it’s funny you mention that because, uh so when we’re looking at B two B functions or in person networking. There’s all sorts of opportunities, and they’re just you have to think outside the box. So for producers, it still might be worthwhile. Toe Look at engineering backgrounds are other associations. So, like, for example, um, I started getting really heavily involved with my Audio Engineering Society chapter, which is A S, and they were in SF. So there was going back to the bay about end of 2015 2016 and then they were hosting listening parties at Coast Mastering, which is a gloriously mastering facility. Now it’s run by, ah, world renowned master engineer Michael Romanowski and this guy’s amazing super super awesome Dude. I was very humbled to be ableto to sit down with them and we’re chatting and stuff. So we had a listening party at his place. And, um, while I’m there, I get solicited to get commissioned for doing a remix for John Connor Birdie, which is, um, but Mix and master Engineer for Joe Satriani, which is a huge rock. Guys, a solo guitar put out probably a dozen or so albums by now, and I was like, Wow, that’s cool, cause I actually I used to listen to Joe, Joe Satcher. Any stuff a lot. When I was growing up, I was like, This is awesome. I would love to. And so we negotiated the rate, and I did, you know, probably 45 hours with the work sent them off a rough demo and stuff in it. It never. You never know what’s gonna happen while you’re there or who you’re going to run into. You have to be open to opportunity. You all you’re doing is lining yourself up under opportunities. So look for business to business functions like that in your area. For me, it was pretty hard. I wasn’t able to continually go just because it’s so expensive to get over the Altamont in deal with travel in the commute times and stuff, it’s It’s a real commitment, especially, you have a day job on top of that. So another avenue. If, for example, Mantilla’s only like 80,000 people now, and I moved there in the nineties when it was like 40,000 it’s super tiny town. There is a nothing thing for entertainment. It took me years to be able just to get to the point where I could relocate. I got very lucky was able to relocate to so Cal where I’m at now, but a lot of people don’t have access to Resource is so online, Resource is, And like we’re talking about earlier the Internet, it can be a mess. But there’s still remote mentor ship capabilities, and you have to find the right Facebook groups to penetrate like folk. Me and you were a part of producer Jo Jo. Another good community that we actually seem to share in common is the six figure home studio community. Ah, and I’ve met both Brian and Chris and their hilarious justice later. Some person is. They are from podcasts. But even looking in their field like I think, are you were you talking with Chris for a while? Er
spk_0                 
so Chris is the co host of the six figure home studio. Brian Hood eyes the other co host, and Brian does mixing for metal. And Chris does. Mastering. Chris is actually taking me through my business where, like the first episode we’re running through, Dude, he chewed my website up and spit it out. But that’s what I needed, and I’m more focused on a business. And so now Chris is my coach. He’s my mentor. He’s teaching me what I need to know to run a successful mixing and mastering studio. Um, yeah, I’ve gone through two months now, and he’s I mean, he’s taught me so much. And that is through an online source that was through listening to the six figure home studio
spk_1                 
even. Ah, so there’s another artist that I’ve been connected with for a while, and he has a discord server, and so he’s built a fairly sizable network of people that follow him. And it’s just this little private community of producers and everybody that’s involved with that scene. Julian Gray. So he writes Elektronik like transit types. Yeah, yeah, yeah and his servers. Pretty awesome that there’s so many helpful people there. But as long as there’s that order, it doesn’t matter. Where you looking at it? I think. Yeah, unknown. It’s a great place. But here’s the thing about mentorship. It doesn’t matter if it’s an interactive person. It could be passive like these podcasts were listening to as long as the information. The source is credible and the information is good. If it’s going to get you somewhere and you’re learning you’re actually getting something valuable out of it for your time. Because time is the most valuable asset we have in life, right? Yeah. We can spend money, that stuff. You’re gonna make more money, no matter what. Don’t worry about that weaken. We commit that back money can be remade. But time you only have so much of that on this planet. And so other sources like I said, doesn’t have to be in the same industry. What are you filling your mind with on a day to day basis? And if you’re finding the right sources, that’s the big key. Goes all the way back to the beginning. Find and identify the right mentor. And I listen to where I’m very selective of the podcasts that I listened to you. So outside of the six figure home studio, maybe listen toe one other. And that’s the ed. My light show is a recent one, and he’s been blowing my mind just because in life coaching things like paying attention to how we treat ourselves self awareness to be able to grow the discipline, to able identify our own blind spots, I think are critical not just for a professional but our personal lives too, because there’s no it. We are people were human. When you’re not gonna go through life and be able to separate the two completely, they’re always gonna be interactive. So it all just comes down to you. Are you paying attention to what you’re feeding yourself To be able to put out what you want to put out in life?
spk_0                 
Time is a huge asset. When you connect with someone, a potential mentor or future mentor and they see potential in you, they see a future in you. They see someone who can really develop themselves and turn into a great songwriter, a great musician, a great producer right there, taking the time out of their day. They’ve got so many other things that they could be doing. I’m sure there’s a 1,000,000 other people they could be talking Teoh. But if they see the potential new and they want to take the time out of their day that they’re not going to get back and put it an investor in you, that is huge. Absolutely the last thing you want to do. The worst thing you could possibly dio is pick that up and just throw it away. That’s a good way of getting blacklisted by someone who could potentially be way bigger. I mean, if you’re getting a mentor there obviously bigger than you, they’re obviously doing bigger and better things than you at that at that moment. And if you just slap him in the face, they’re going to remember that. And I guarantee they’ve got a lot bigger of a network than you dio. And that’s going to be a bad situation for you to be putting, especially if they’re looking
spk_1                 
honestly, I’ve been in both sides of the fence in every one of those situations. I’ve been through it all. But you know what? Here’s the thing for anybody who’s listening right now, who is maybe thinking about looking for a mentor. They don’t know where to start, and they’ve never start before or something. If fear is holding you back, that’s the wall you gotta bust through that wall. Don’t be afraid to get started. Do it now. Take massive action. Don’t wait, because the more you wait, the more you build up anticipation and the more it’s just gonna make you psych out. But you’re gonna psych yourself out to the point where you don’t even try. And believe me, I’ve been there. I’ve done that. If
spk_0                 
you could be doing one of two things waiting around, not even doing it because you’re so afraid, Um or you could be waiting for them to come to you, which I guarantee, is not gonna be the case. They’re not going to come to you. It’s very I shouldn’t say never. But it’s very rare that a mentor will find a mentee that they want to take under their wing. I mean, it’s so, so rare. And if that’s the case, if you’re waiting around for the right moment, they could be taking someone else under their wing breath. Right now, while you’re waiting while you’re wasting time, either someone else’s reaching out and getting that connection before you can, or they’re gonna find someone to give that connection to Absolutely. So you don’t want to waste your time around this. You. It is very important to find a teacher and a mentor as soon as possible, because that’s just going to get you a step closer to whatever your dream is or whatever your goal is at the end of the day for being a producer.
spk_1                 
Yeah, and that’s everything, too. I’ve noticed about successful people, the ones who have been in the industry, the longest to have that built. They built that the success they’ve built up their bullshit meter. Like they they can sense the time wasters from the go getters. And yeah, it’s not, it’s not. Don’t take it personal because, everybody, I believe everybody has the potential of degree. Everybody has the you know you have a dream, you have a purpose in life, and it’s just a matter of connecting with that best part of you that knows how to go get it. And that takes work because we’re not. We’re not perfect were in perfect human beings, and we’ve gotta work on our flaws. But the ones who work on it, the ones to start, it’ll start just clicking, and that’s that’s the ones that they sense. But let’s say you’re a new person right now. You’ve never you never dealt with a mentor before and you want to do you want to approach somebody. You’re looking for somebody in person, so I’ll give you my experience. I went through this recently I reached out Teoh. Why was due out that listening party? So I’m I de mode, our song for my artist profile. We debuted our first track and was like this chill step track. And obviously I’m dealing with an older crowd at the listening parties. A lot of older engineers. There’s guys that work adobe there. There’s guys from Universal Audio there that there’s big names in the room and it felt pretty good because I was able to impress them with my track. And then afterward I was asking, um, I was asking Michael Romanowski if a yes chapter had any mentorship programs through A s. He’s like, Yeah, I know they don’t really do anything like that, however, and this is where I jumped on the ball immediately. Just I come, Officer. Yeah, I am definitely serious about it, whatever it takes. And so I would say this. If you’re looking as somebody as a potential mentor, the very first step is, don’t be afraid to approach them. Just take the initiative and reach out because I guarantee you there are 10 other people in the room that might be wanting to do the very same thing is you, but they’re too afraid to make that step. You already bolder than the rest for taking the initiative and just being like, Hey, I’m here.
spk_0                 
I mean, that’s exactly what I did. And, as you’re saying this approaching, whether it’s in person and emails the same way, it’s very in emails, one of the best ways to connect with someone because it’s non intrusive. They can read it and respond whenever the hell they want and in I am is the same way. And that’s exactly what I did with Noah. I took the initiative, I saw an opportunity. I saw someone local in my scene who’s connected. And I thought, This is a huge opportunity for me. Let me reach out to him through an I am. I mean, he responded within, like, an hour. He responded, and he was totally humble, completely nice in the moment. I was that person, I was afraid. I mean, I had his profile pulled up and I was looking at the message. By now I was going. Am I going to do this? This feels weird. This Phil feels icky and it will it it’s gonna feel gross That initial first approach. It feels weird, but once you do it once you get over it. Once I hit that send button, I didn’t like butterflies hit me. I was like, What? Did I just do so much better? Yeah, I was like, I just I never been to
spk_1                 
the gym before and you’re trying to start working out and you’re moving the weight. Seems like this feels awkward and you feel like all the eyes are on you in the room. I know. They know. I stick out, I stand out because I suck at this right now. But afterward, when you if you just grind through it, you did. You did your workout, right? And you’re leaving the building. You feel pretty good, right? Man, I actually feel really I feel a lot better. I’ve heard Ed my let’s say this, actually. And he said, When it comes to things that we do that lead to success, we don’t feel the effect over. We don’t see the effect of for six months to a year. That’s a huge buffer, right? So we talked about that feedback cycle. There’s some things that we just cannot shorten that cycle of and that’s this. Whatever that success means to us, the thing that we’re trying to grow, its going to take time. So the habits and the things that we’re doing now to build on our success if it takes six months to a year to do it successfully, we have to be patient. We have to know, just like working out. It’s gonna take weeks, if not months, before we start seeing the results and you’re like, Man, we actually actually look pretty good. I got muscling out. I totally transform my body. But look at the journey that she had to go through. It was six months to a year to get to that body. And so conversely, if you start sabotaging yourself if you’re not putting in the work, if you’re getting lazy, if you’re avoiding doing the work that you know, you need to dio, you start filling that 60 to 90 days out so the failures don’t rear their heads. But they were the heads a lot faster and you feel you start to feel that a lot sooner and then it’s hard to correct.
spk_0                 
I like that. That’s very well said. That is very, very well said. I think it’s
spk_1                 
had to still have Remember, my life has been an awesome dude, that that’s his podcast. You’d I would definitely recommend anybody that’s looking for, like, personal life coaching. Just go listen his broadcast. Was it the ad My Let Max out with Ed My lead at my last? Yeah, it’s m i m y l e t t. Let’s say
spk_0                 
I approach a mentor, but they’re not comfortable with being an actual mentor for me. I’m just starting as an artist. I need you know, this tip this tip this tip Um, I’m trying to work on my branding. What do I go for a logo? How about coming up with the name? But they’re just like, that’s a little bit too much work for me to do,
spk_1                 
right? I would say, What’s the next step for anybody in this? This could This could apply to anything. If you’re a producer and engineer whatever, or if your goal is to just learn how to be like your idol. Um, just let’s just be honest, be genuine, Be yourself. Number one just own it. Own where you’re at and let them know like, Hey, I’m just starting now. I would love to learn all this stuff. This is what you’re doing, you know? Can I learn on new? You be direct, don’t waste their time, but yeah, there is some subtlety to it. Obviously have to have some persona Cem some communication skills in persuasion skills. And that helps to build that. So, for example, when I was approaching Michael, I said, Yeah, I was serious about that. And so I went and I made the pitch. No. And I did it when I might follow up through email. That said, I appreciate what you talk talking with me the other day about it. I love to take you out to lunch. You name the place, my treats on me that we can just sit down, have a discussion over lunch. And obviously we’re out of his building. We have to worry about another setting, but we can just discuss what, um, apprenticeship or mentorship might mean Let’s discuss it what it would look like. Yeah, and see if you’re open to that and so that you take all the pressure off of them. You’re offering them something and it’s are you doing is trying to get a date because this is this is step number one. I think people, people, and I’ve been learning this with my financial business on the other side to side do life insurance, sales and financial advising as well. And this is the stuff that I’ve been learning from my mentors. And a lot of times, this creatives, what we do is we focus on the very end goal we’re picturing that when we’re picturing that trophy were picturing ourselves away down the pipeline way down there. We’re looking for that end result were way too far in the future.
spk_0                 
Their picture themselves had lying e d. C. Before they’ve even written their first top one Top 10 track and be
spk_1                 
pet. And if you’re trying to approach a mentor and your pit, what you’re picturing is the result of what you’re going to get from it. Mentor, you think it too far ahead. If you’re reaching out to a mentor, your goal. For that. Just focus on getting a date set, getting an appointment, getting their time, getting them to say yes to you to give you some time. That’s all you need. Once you Once you’ve got your foot in the door. Game games on whatever, whatever is, you can hit a grand slam. You can, and that’s just just get on the field.
spk_0                 
Definitely. I think that’s huge. If you’re getting a little bit of pushback, you just need to get that first scheduled date. Even if it’s a phone call, That’s the other thing. If you can just give on the phone for five or 10 minutes other day, get that one on one time. That’s really what it is that one on one time. If you’re meeting them in a crowded area, let’s say you’re out of venue and you meet them at venue or a big event. That’s probably not the best time to schedule something or really get something narrowed in because they’re talking to a 1,000,000 people. There’s a 1,000,000 things going. Absolutely. You at least get their attention. Introduce yourself, talk to him a little bit and say, Hey, could I get your phone number? K. G. Your email. I’d like to discuss the more things with you.
spk_1                 
Yeah, nothing is to show that you’re committed and show that you’re committed. Don’t just come out them like, Hey, can you teach me how to do what you dio make them a beautiful the beneficial offer and make it something. Try to think ahead in terms of Okay, if you’re asking for a mentor ship, they might be thinking like Okay, what do you want for me? What do you want to teach you? Exactly? And so you you have to come at them with something specific, give them something specific that you would like to learn from them. And so when I’m reaching out, for example, I’ll use Michael Romanowski. That master engineer. Um, I said I’d like to learn how to run the business the way you do. I love to learn to play at that level. And I’ve done obviously, I’m impressed him with my track to the point where I got his attention. S o, that was step number one. Obviously, that did some of the work for me. But making a mutually beneficial offer is obviously my goal from the mentorship was I actually got him to devote that he had He was looking for another mastering engineer for his facility at the time, So I lucked out like it was That was pretty cool because it was like timing. The timing was everything. And if this mentor ship works out, maybe I could fill that position. If that’s if if things air working in our favor. I wanted to benefit you just as much as it benefits me.
spk_0                 
If you’re serious about this and you’re serious about the mentor you’re looking at, and either a, they don’t have the time to just do free work or you don’t have enough value to provide for them. What’s going, What are they gonna want out of it? I guarantee they would love to see a price tag on that they would. They would not mind seeing a small price, and it could be a small price tag. You can say you know what? I would love to hours of your week for 100 bucks. That’s 50 bucks an hour. They’re making off of that. OK, you know, my mixing is really bad. I would love it if I could send you three tracks a week. You can give me detailed notes on my mixing what I need to work on. I’ll give you $100 in return, right? That’s providing them value that is numb worth it to them. If you’re a smaller producer and you’re looking for someone above you to take you under their wing, let’s say you’re looking at another producer who’s putting out really good stuff. They’re starting to get signed to relatively big labels. They’re starting to play more shows. Well, I guarantee they still have a second job or 1/3 job. They’re not full time is a producer. Now. When someone another producer, comes in and says, Hey, I love your stuff I really would like some advice or some feedback. Um, my mixing isn’t that great? Could I pay you $100 for you to start giving me some feedback on tracks? They’re gonna go? Oh, yes, cause Guess what? Now I’m making money for giving feedback, becoming a coach as a producer. They’re gonna look if anyone came to me as a producer and said, I’ll give you 100 bucks to give me feedback. Well, first of all, I’ll give anyone feedback for free. But if my time was becoming too valuable and I had a producer come to me and say, Hey, I would love it. If you were my mentor, could I pay you a fee would be, yes, because guess what? That’s just pushing me forward a little bit more to where I can go full
spk_1                 
time. Absolutely. Yeah, There’s something funny about our industry and music and audio that it seems like everybody’s hungry like their passion is super passionate, but they’re hungry. They’re always doing something and whether they have to have a full time job or a day job or a part time job, whatever it is, that’s funding them to do what they want to dio. They’re doing multiple things to make it happen. And so that’s what makes it tough because, yeah, uh, I’ve learned when I have done marketing for my social events because I was putting together listening parties of my own. I was inspired by what Michael was doing out there in the bay. I was able to reach out to a lot of the corporate world, like in the audio industry. There’s hardware manufacturers. The corporate world works a little bit more structured, so just a little life tip. If anybody’s looking to improve their contact skills, there’s some tips like you don’t want him email somebody on a Monday or a Friday because Monday they’re just getting back from vacation, their inboxes already inundated there, trying to catch up to the work that they’re missing. And then Friday, that’s the end of the week. They already birds out there, rate. They’re already thinking about their weekend there. They’re not going to respond. They’re gonna be sluggish the middle of the week. The Tuesday Wednesday Thursday I would probably do on a Tuesday. That’s the perfect time to reach out, because then that gives them 48 hours to respond back and be like, Hey, I’ll follow up with you next week and you don’t want to be the super incessant like my spammy. I’m getting an email a day. Just be genuinely interested. Okay, here’s my offer. This is what I’m looking for again respect their time because you want to respect yours. You want them to respect it as well. And there’s something funny that it’s almost like karma has this way of working out really well where when you begin to respect yourself, others respect you, too. So if you respect to your time, it will come across like you’re respecting. There’s too, just inherently, and that will change the way you approach things to. It’ll change. The wording that you use. It will change your posture. The way that you communicate, everything is more.
spk_0                 
It’ll change your value to overall, your value will change.
spk_1                 
And when you start doing that, um, and you’re reaching out to these people And that brings me back to my point where if I’m looking at the audio industry, it is gonna be a lot tougher to get their attention. Be consistent, be persistent. Don’t give up just because they didn’t respond to one email, Don’t move onto the next person. It might take seven times, in fact, on average, because we’re so busy because we’re so consumed. It’s not that we don’t care. It’s not that we’re gonna just, like, delete it because we see it. We read it were like Nope, not come deal that it’s just that we didn’t have time were too distracted. If you look at like if we talk about persuasion and sales, for example, you’re selling yourself right. And so when it comes to this cell, whenever you’re buying in your buying often emotion, nobody buys an awful logic. That’s just not how humans are wired. We might use logic to to reason things or rationalize things. But when it comes to actually making the decision, what makes our decision forces our emotions? And so how do we feel? How you making that person feel at that moment? Are you making them super psyched and be like If you can paint a picture for them of what the wind looks like for them? Do you want you’ve won that battle? You’re looking for the wind for them. So if I said, for example, I want to go to this master engineer because I love the way he does his work, I want to play at that level, and I believe I will be a good asset to your business. I would love to help you take it to the next level. I can tap you into a younger audience than you’re currently dealing with. What I did right there was I said, Hey, I’m willing to bring a market to you. That’s a win. If he’s hungry, he’s gonna take it.
spk_0                 
Oh, and the way you can apply this as a producer is your fans. How many people are on your social media who are commenting, interacting with your posts sharing your stuff. How many streams can you show them? Streams on Spotify So you can be like, Listen, I I have a fan base people who are listening and they’ll look at that and go, Oh, those air fans that I’d might not have that I could potentially pick up is well, so they’re seeing value in U where if you guys do collaboration in the future, I mean, you’re you’re opening them up to a whole nother market of other.
spk_1                 
That’s brilliant and collaborations as part of Mentor ship to because there’s so many different ways that you can elevate your production game just by larding away that somebody else is working. Cameron, how
spk_0                 
can you prove your worth to a mentor? You sentiment track, they give you detailed notes. Now, how do you prove that? What they just did for you? The time that they’ve spent for you is worth it.
spk_1                 
That’s such a deep question, man. You have to picture yourself going for that barrier. Whatever it is that they’re challenging with, they should be challenging you with enough that you feel like you just barely can do it. And you know what You gotta push yourself to go beyond it. Like I’m learning. I’m struggling. If it’s a struggle, you go in the right direction. Proving your worth as a really about stepping up to that challenge, taking massive action. Not waiting, Not not, You know, don’t get discouraged either. And just think of for the opportunity if anything, like Hey, you know, I might have failed at this today. Give me one more day. I’m trying to do this. What if there’s a timeline involved? And I think this is what it comes down to. Do you believe in yourself? If you want to prove your worth, start proving to yourself first. You have to believe, in fact, just commit to believing right away the moment you’ve gone for it. You’ve already started. So even if you’ve already started now you gonna believe even harder. Because if they’re challenging with something like, No way, that’s impossible. All right. Oh, right away. You have to You have to stop yourself right there in that moment and say, You know what? If he thinks that’s possible, I need to believe that it’s possible I’ll get there.
spk_0                 
If you’re a producer and you send your track to a mentor who’s a bigger producer, and they give you detailed notes on feedback there, giving you feedback. Understand it’s feedback also understand your inner creative space. So everything is subjective. Um, there they might hear stuff. I mean, I’ve sent tracks to mentors plenty of times where they’re like, I don’t like this, this and that and I go Okay, that’s a personal preference. I like that. I wanted that you like that, But you can’t say that cannot be your answer for everything. If they take the time to send you detailed notes on things that you should work on with your track or issues they see, you can’t say, Well, I meant to do all of that. What are you doing? Your road blocking? You’re saying what you just told me? Yeah, that’s not accurate at all. I wanted it all to sound like that. So you’re wasting their time. Well, the best way to approach is be like, thank you so much every time I get feedback on anything, I am so appreciative because they took time other day to help me out with things that I’m struggling with, and it’s that’s I wouldn’t have found those things that I was struggling with. Had I not had someone directly tell me this is the issue with a B and C Now that the best way to approach it is be like, Thank you so much. I appreciate you taking the time. I’m gonna go in the studio, work on this stuff right now and really go through what they’re telling you. Work on it, listen to the difference of what you had before and after, and I guarantee you’ll be like, Oh, wow, that sounds way better when you’re done. If you’ve gone through and fixed all of the things that they said you need to work on, pull your track into a new project, your exported MP three year way file and pull your old violin and a B them right and listen cause you will hear the difference. You get this excitement, you go.
spk_1                 
Whoa, This is huge. I just found I found someone who could help
spk_0                 
me out with all these issues that I’ve had for so long, and you’re gonna appreciate the time that they take even more and that you’re going to send that track to them and they’re gonna listen to everything you did in the radio. This is brilliant. That he’s this producer is taking what I said working on this studio and actually working on those corrections and that starts clicking with them. This kid’s worth it. That this person is worth it. They’re working on what they need to work on, and your next tracks gonna be even better.
spk_1                 
And that’s any more excited work on with you as mentors, they’re investing time and into you as a mentee, and that’s that’s a key thing. That’s a key factor that all you have to do to prove your worth is respect their time, obviously, are gonna do that to show your gratitude. Show your gratitude for them even if you failed. Like if you’re struggling, you’re still not learning it. And it’s been, however, many weeks or months, and it’s still not clicking. Just kgo Hey, I appreciate your time. You’re doing so great just to help me out. I’m still willing to learn. Don’t give up, just keep showing up. And when it finally pays off, it’s gonna feel good for them, too, because they’re looking. They’re the reason they’re even taking on a mentee or they’re willing to take you on is because they have some sense of wanting to give back to the community to. And so they want you to succeed. They want you to win. And, yeah, that. Here’s the thing. Everybody roots for the underdog. But nobody ever vision envisions himself being the underdog what it’s like to be the underdog. All the work and sweat and tears and blood that had to be. You had to go through to be that one before you come out on top. So the ones that struggle the most often have the visit. Biggest success. And if they have failed so many times before, finally clicked. It feels that much better to hit that win. You know what? Your mentors right there along your side nearly. Dude, you killed it. This is it. This is what we’ve been waiting for. That payoff is immense.
spk_0                 
When I first had mentors, the first mentors I got with our seven it was a struggle for about a year. I mean, it was blood, sweat and tears. No track was good, man. They got better. They did. They got better, but they weren’t great. It was always a massive list of things I need to work on. But I do remember the the first time that I sent a track to them and they went, Wow! And that was huge. That was so difficult to get that to get that Wow. I mean, it was so much time grinding in the studio, working with them, them giving me notes and me working on those notes. And when I got that wow, there was no better feeling than that. It was just getting that acceptance of approval. And I just knew I’m up another tier and like,
spk_1                 
But even before you got that win, you still kept showing up. You like. Even though you fail, you keep bringing failures to them. They keep sending it back to the border police. Sir, may I have another police? There may have another. You keep showing up. That’s what shows your worth that you’re gonna keep. And your best thing is if you take the initiative to keep following up with them, if you reach out to them, you do all the work for them. They’re just like, 00 cool. He’s one to fall up. He’s scheduling the dates for me like, yeah, I have that friends do that that takes all of the work out of their hands so they can focus on just giving you the best plan of action possible.
spk_0                 
Um, I think that’s about it. Uh, let’s, um Do you have anything else you want to
spk_1                 
talk about? Yeah. So if we’re if we’re gonna recap on mentorship just obviously looking for mentors, that means more than just looking for a person to train under doesn’t have to be in person. It could be online. It could be remote sessions. It could be passive. It could be a podcast. It can be a YouTube channel. Whatever source of information that you can filter down, it’s gonna give you the best chance to accelerate your growth. That’s what you’re looking for. Your trying to filter out all the other noise in the world and just hone in on that one thing that’s going to help you with what you want to accomplish in life. That’s really what a mentor mentorship is all about. But it doesn’t have to be active. It could be passive. Now that you’ve identity, that’s the hardest part. Probably is identifying What exactly do I want to do? What I want to be the best at Who’s my hero? Where who do I idolise who might looking up to at the top of the industry? That way I have a clear path. I know what’s up with what direction up is for me from there. It’s just about looking for those mentors and taking it one step at a time. And, yeah, we need the obviously. It’s easy to find the ones at the very top because they have the most visibility. But it can be somebody right above you or even adjacent to you with a little bit more experience that then you in that subject, so being clear on what subject it is, you want to learn from them. That’s another big help. But looking for mentors could be done anywhere again. Business to business functions Find societies. The ASCAP Songwriters Expo A to I Am, which is the Publishers Association. There’s so many things in the music industry, and it’s so big and so diverse. Think outside the box and connect with people outside of the immediate thing like you don’t want, just connect with other producers. You want to connect with other people who are doing roles that might supplement what you dio and then online sources. Like I just said, remote coaching. Like what you’re doing with Chris Graham.
spk_0                 
Online sources also being Facebook groups like you like we were talking about before. That’s gonna be huge, ash. Um, and approaching them is the next step after them. So you’ve figured out you figured out who or what kind of mentor you’re looking for. Find out where they’re located. Are they Facebook Group? Are they going to an event that you can meet in person? Um, how do you approach them now? You’re gonna want to either A if you’re in person getting an email, just getting email or a phone number that you can call so that you can schedule, Um, if it’s in a Facebook group to just find stuff, if they’re posting comment on their stuff, get them to recognize your face in your name, comment like their stuff, and then eventually just shoot him in. I am. And just do it. Just approach and do it. Make that first contact shake that hand. Give him your name.
spk_1                 
I think the key differentiator here. If you want to separate yourselves from everybody else, that’s reaching out to him. If you respect your time, you’ll start to notice that they respect your time to. They respect you. You’ll be respectful of their time and they’ll respect yours. Let’s
spk_0                 
dive into our last topic, which is separate from mentor ship. But it’s a little project that you and I have been working on. Hold this man what the past, like three or four weeks, and we’ve got a lot of stuff to finish up on it. But, man, I’m extremely excited about this. Do you want to dive into This is your idea that you brought to me, So I’ll let you kind of explain the inspiration behind it, what the goals are and really what this first event is going to be all about.
spk_1                 
So we’re launching the mastering gauntlet and we’ll probably announcing the website and everything. July Ah, and we’ll try to get some leads going, but basically the mastering gauntlets of challenge. So the entire month of August, we’re gonna do one song a day, and both Christian and I will master the song and the artist gets the pick which one they like. They’re not gonna know who’s this who’s but they get to pick which one they like. At the end of the month, we’re gonna tally them all up and we’re going to announce a gauntlet champion who’s basically had the most wins under their belt and the loser, actually, Actually, there’s some skin in the game here. We actually are gonna have donation pool set up so that the loser has to donate to the charity of choice. Now, we’re gonna have a pre selected list that we’re trying to narrow down right now. But we’re gonna have a pre selected list that you’ll be able to vote on when you submit your song and you’ll be able Teoh, what The most votes are going to go towards. Whatever, that’s what. We’re gonna donate the money. So yeah, the, um the contest will run for a month. We’re gonna do and there some rules. We’ve laid down some ground work already. We’re still trying to get into some other stuff we may have. Some sponsors were starting to set a lot of that stuff up now because we want to make it. We want to make it worthwhile for everybody. Because obviously, if we do get more submissions than just, you know, 31 for the month of August, we want to be able to make it worthwhile for every producer that enters into something. So that way it’s worth everybody’s time. Even if we don’t get to their song, I guarantee you it’s gonna be It’s gonna be beneficial for everybody
spk_0                 
If we find a sponsor affiliate that’s just willing to donate or match a dollar amount to the charity. That’s even better because we’re giving more out. I agree. But the other thing is, we’re trying to connect with some plug and companies. Are you working with a sample company as well that you’re gonna be reaching out to?
spk_1                 
Yeah, yeah, We’re looking for companies that will help producers elevate their production game because obviously, the end goal is to help everybody make better productions.
spk_0                 
Yeah, and so if you basically just submitting entering giving us your email entering in your track, you will get entered into a giveaway where a sponsor will hopefully be giving off some sort of plug in bundle sample bundle, preset bundles, something like that. So even if your track isn’t selected for the month of August. You could still potentially win something that’s gonna help you out in the long run,
spk_1                 
right? It’s gonna be awesome. And we’re gonna have fun.
spk_0                 
Yes. So we’re going to be taking submissions July 1st until August 1st, um, and then selecting tracks throughout the month, up until the last day of July and in August 1st were getting on it. We’re gonna be mastering tracks. I think some of the rules are We only have two hours to master the track and we have to record the session. Or I think what I’m gonna be doing is streaming all of my session. I So if you guys follow me, I think my twitch account is like at envious audio. I’ll have it posted on my social accounts that you can follow, but yeah, you guys will be ableto watch me, master. These tracks live for that two hours, so it will be
spk_1                 
fun trying to figure out my setups. That way I can make sure you get the light stream up. Yeah, it’s one is the accountability aspect, but I think too it’s just I wanted to make a challenge, and this is. It started off just me by myself for the entire month of August. Tried to get free, mastering for people to accelerate my growth. Didn’t want to be able to challenge myself. I want to work faster, more efficiently and still get great results. And what better way to do to accelerate my growth than to challenge myself with stuff? You know that you’re working more worth and over had to do in my life. So it’s not that much more work, obviously. But, you know, we both got day jobs gonna work on the side. Um, at least for the time being. Um, but, yeah, the challenge is gonna be amazing like that. Whether we win or lose, there’s an opportunity to grow.
spk_0                 
Giving back to the community is huge. Not just with the charity, but for you as a producer. If you’re a producer out there and you just can’t afford to get a track Master, this is your opportunity to get a track mastered by some professionals. And the way it’s set up to is we aren’t doing revisions, so no one can come back and say, I like this. Tweet it. You get what you get you Vote on the best one, however, wants. At the end of the month, you are able to come to us to get revisions, and we’ll have a price point on that. You were
spk_1                 
a communication block during the challenge, obviously, for challenge rations to keep it fair just because obviously there’s time limitations on what we’re allowed to do. But also it’s it would create a competitive advantage if we’re allowed to talk to you. The artists right, But we’ll get more into it. We’ll release more details as we get closer to that date. I am super excited. I am pumped. Meteo, I think this is a view diving thing for right now. This season one we’re gonna call Electric Summer because obviously we’re doing with electronic music, and I believe August is ah, hot August a visa nights or whatever, It’s Ah, Jesus. Pretty big Elektronik scene is huge, especially in the month of August. I think that just lines up perfectly on Guy. No, A lot of artists are going to be ready to drop tracks around that time, and it just seems like it’s lining up perfectly. So,
spk_0                 
yeah, I’ve already got people I’ve mentioned it to a couple of producers who are like, let me know when I consider because I am ready to submit. Awesome. Is so Yeah, it’s gonna be a lot of fun. Be al will be releasing more details on that. Uh, I’ll be talking about it more on the podcast, too, once we get closer and I’ll provide some links where people can go follow once we get closer to that data
spk_1                 
and we should have the website up early enough that we’ll be ableto have the website available once all of the info is ready and to be able
spk_0                 
to share people can at least read maybe that submit quite yet. But they can read about the event about us is how do you
spk_1                 
have all the rules on there? We’ll have a fact on their It’ll it’ll be set up and ready to go. We might even have a sizzle trailer. Oh, yeah. So it’s gonna be
spk_0                 
awesome. Well, Karen, do you have a plugs? Anything that you’re doing that’s coming up? Where can people go find your stuff? Where can they hire you as a mastering engineer?
spk_1                 
Yes. So if they go to www dot neo logic studios dot com. It’s like Neo from the Matrix and then logic and studios dot com. Um, you’ll find my mastering services on their my portfolios on their, uh, I’m definitely working on some upgrades cause I haven’t been able to be active on what? Developing my site. I usually do it all myself, but I do have a Web developer. I’m starting to hand some of that off to you. Um, yeah, go there, check on my site. If you’re looking for mastering, I do free master previews and mixed critiques. And then from there, if you still want the serve, if you like what we’re doing, you can just, you know, pay for right there. Or if you have mixed revisions, it’s all covered under my one rate. So So, yeah, it’s it’s pretty sweet. I’ve been getting a lot of service right now. I’m actually working on some motion video stuff for some other artists. That’s another one that I’ve been diving into. Building music. Visualize er’s marketing videos, that kind of stuff. Um,
spk_0                 
what about your social accounts working me? What’s your where you handled?
spk_1                 
So it’s at NEA Logic studios for instagram. Um and then just camera bash on Twitter. I’m Everly on Twitter and then state that you can find me on Facebook. Just find me by my name came a Basha or Geologic Studios the studio page. But yeah, I tend to post mostly an instagram I have because I’ve been following a lot of life. Coach guys like at my let all of my studio post lately have been about life advice. So if you’re looking for that extra edge that pushes you to just keep pushing forward with your goals and your dreams definitely follow and followed my lead and follow the guys that I’m re posting from her I’m sharing with their great sources of inspiration, though
spk_0                 
Yeah, I’ll make some show notes to so I’ll provide links to all of the things we talked about in this episode on your website. And my let will get all those links.
spk_1                 
And don’t forget, we also have ah, producer Dojo. So L Gates is another leading source. That’s their communities. Awesome. So if you’re not a part of that, actually, go there.
spk_0                 
Yeah, I got some mentor ship through their producer Dodo, actually, through the class of eight, await When I was doing that, I had a membership for about a year. Oh, nice. Um, if you’re not a part of that Facebook group, the producer dough, you’ve got to get in that group there is. It’s such a well moderated group. There’s no spamming. No one’s promoting themselves. It’s people asking for how people provided
spk_1                 
even that, like if like you. So you took the class of eight away. But you don’t have to do the class of eight await. They also have webinars that ill Gates himself will host every so often, and even for free, he’s given out such amazing in photo help get you on the right track to be a productive, be efficient at, you know and put out more. And that’s the thing is we all want to put out more right. We want to be the dream versions of ourselves. These are the types of leaders we need to look for, whether it’s L. Gates or Ed. My let find somebody who’s gonna help you grow, and that’s what a mentor ships all about.
spk_0                 
All of the mentors that are a part of the class of Aid Away are in that group, in their active. You can call them out and they will respond. Are you part of the gravitas Create group?
spk_1                 
I am not. But you have to invite me. That sounds awesome.
spk_0                 
Yeah, you’ve got to get in the gravitas, create group. That’s another awesome one Great community of people supporting each other helping each other out. And they actually just got a mentor ship program. So you can. There’s a section you can click on for mentors and met mentees, and you can scroll through people. I actually just create a mentor profile. So if anyone wants me to be their mentor, you can go to the gravitas. Great group, join it. You can find me as a mentor and request me as a mental right on time, and you go in there, you can read their profile. So people put their basically their bio of what they do in the industry and how how they can provide value. And you can request them as a mentor and boom. There you go. There’s your step forward. There’s your step to finding a mentor. And there’s a bunch of great mentors in there. Ari guys. Well, that’s it for this episode. I really appreciate you taking the time in listening. I have one quick favor to ask you if you found any use in this episode and you learned anything useful from this If you went over to iTunes to rate review and subscribe to the podcast. You know, one of the biggest messages that I want to put across with this podcast is that I’m here to help you, and I want to keep bringing on guests. And I want to find bigger guests to bring on who can help teach you to monetize everything you do in the studio. But in order to do that, I need to know that you’re listening and that you’re actually getting something from this show. So if you could please head over to iTunes rate, review it, subscribe it. I would love that. Head on over to envious audio dot com slash podcast to check out the show notes. I’ll have all the links to the topics we discussed today. Stay tuned for the next episode where I’ve got Alberto Day Caza on. He owns his own studio. He does mawr mixing and mastering for rock bands, but he’s going to be coming on. We’re gonna be discussing how to brand yourself as an artist, which is vital in this industry. Especially if you want to monetize yourself as a producer and you want to run your own studio. You have to start branding yourself to get you a step ahead of everyone else. That’s it
spk_1                 
for now. I’ll see you guys next time.
 
 

Recent Episodes

Want to help support the show? Leave a usefull review of the podcast, and let me know what you think!